Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBauer, Michael
dc.contributor.authorGlenn, Tasha
dc.contributor.authorRasgon, Natalie L.
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Wendy K.
dc.contributor.authorSagduyu, Kemal
dc.contributor.authorMunoz, Rodrigo A.
dc.contributor.authorSchmid, Rita
dc.contributor.authorHaack, Sara
dc.contributor.authorWhybrow, Peter C.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:28.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:10:31Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:10:31Z
dc.date.issued2011-01-01
dc.date.submitted2013-02-06
dc.identifier.citationCompr Psychiatry. 2011 Jan-Feb;52(1):17-25. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2010.04.005. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2010.04.005" target="_blank">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0010-440X (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.comppsych.2010.04.005
dc.identifier.pmid21220061
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/46066
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: There is broad consensus from epidemiologic research that lower socioeconomic status is related to poorer health. This study investigated the relation between median family income and self-reported mood symptoms in patients with bipolar disorder who reside in the United States. METHODS: Two hundred eighty-four patients with bipolar disorder provided daily self-reported mood ratings for 6 months (50,054 days of data). Regardless of income, all patients were treated by a psychiatrist, took psychotropic medications, and participated in computerized self-monitoring throughout the study. Median family income was obtained from US census tract data. The association between income and mood was analyzed using income as both a continuous and categorical variable. Demographic characteristics were compared by income group. Education level was included in the analysis a priori. RESULTS: Both the continuous and categorical approaches found a positive association between income and euthymia, a negative association between income and manic/hypomanic symptoms including those due to mixed states, and no association between income and depressive symptoms. Patients in the lower-income group spent 12.4% fewer days euthymic than those in the upper-income group and 9.7% fewer days euthymic than those in the middle-income group. Patients in the lower-income group spent 7.1% more days with manic/hypomanic symptoms than those in the upper-income group. There was no association between education and income. CONCLUSION: Median family income is associated with mood symptoms in patients with bipolar disorder. Inclusion of income as a measure of socioeconomic status is recommended for future studies of outcome in bipolar disorder.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=21220061&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2010.04.005
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subject*Affect
dc.subjectBipolar Disorder
dc.subjectChi-Square Distribution
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subject*Income
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factors
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleAssociation between median family income and self-reported mood symptoms in bipolar disorder
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleComprehensive psychiatry
dc.source.volume52
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_pp/596
dc.identifier.contextkey3660330
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVE: There is broad consensus from epidemiologic research that lower socioeconomic status is related to poorer health. This study investigated the relation between median family income and self-reported mood symptoms in patients with bipolar disorder who reside in the United States.</p> <p>METHODS: Two hundred eighty-four patients with bipolar disorder provided daily self-reported mood ratings for 6 months (50,054 days of data). Regardless of income, all patients were treated by a psychiatrist, took psychotropic medications, and participated in computerized self-monitoring throughout the study. Median family income was obtained from US census tract data. The association between income and mood was analyzed using income as both a continuous and categorical variable. Demographic characteristics were compared by income group. Education level was included in the analysis a priori.</p> <p>RESULTS: Both the continuous and categorical approaches found a positive association between income and euthymia, a negative association between income and manic/hypomanic symptoms including those due to mixed states, and no association between income and depressive symptoms. Patients in the lower-income group spent 12.4% fewer days euthymic than those in the upper-income group and 9.7% fewer days euthymic than those in the middle-income group. Patients in the lower-income group spent 7.1% more days with manic/hypomanic symptoms than those in the upper-income group. There was no association between education and income.</p> <p>CONCLUSION: Median family income is associated with mood symptoms in patients with bipolar disorder. Inclusion of income as a measure of socioeconomic status is recommended for future studies of outcome in bipolar disorder.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_pp/596
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pages17-25


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record