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dc.contributor.authorBauer, Michael
dc.contributor.authorGlenn, Tasha
dc.contributor.authorAlda, Martin
dc.contributor.authorAndreassen, Ole A.
dc.contributor.authorArdau, Raffaella
dc.contributor.authorBellivier, Frank
dc.contributor.authorBerk, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBjella, Thomas D.
dc.contributor.authorBossini, Letizia
dc.contributor.authorDel Zompo, Maria
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Seetal
dc.contributor.authorFagiolini, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorFrye, Mark A.
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez-Pinto, Ana
dc.contributor.authorHenry, Chantal
dc.contributor.authorKapczinski, Flavio
dc.contributor.authorKliwicki, Sebastian
dc.contributor.authorKonig, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorKunz, Mauricio
dc.contributor.authorLafer, Beny
dc.contributor.authorLopez-Jaramillo, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorManchia, Mirko
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Wendy K.
dc.contributor.authorMartinez-Cengotitabengoa, Monica
dc.contributor.authorMelle, Ingrid
dc.contributor.authorMorken, Gunnar
dc.contributor.authorMunoz, Rodrigo A.
dc.contributor.authorNery, Fabiano G.
dc.contributor.authorO'Donovan, Claire
dc.contributor.authorPfennig, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorQuiroz, Danilo
dc.contributor.authorRasgon, Natalie L.
dc.contributor.authorReif, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorRybakowski, Janusz
dc.contributor.authorSagduyu, Kemal
dc.contributor.authorSimhandl, Christian
dc.contributor.authorTorrent, Carla
dc.contributor.authorVieta, Eduard
dc.contributor.authorZetin, Mark
dc.contributor.authorWhybrow, Peter C.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:28.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:10:32Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:10:32Z
dc.date.issued2012-09-01
dc.date.submitted2013-02-06
dc.identifier.citationBipolar Disord. 2012 Sep;14(6):654-63. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-5618.2012.01025.x. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-5618.2012.01025.x" target="_blank"> Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1398-5647 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1399-5618.2012.01025.x
dc.identifier.pmid22612720
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/46069
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Although bipolar disorder has high heritability, the onset occurs during several decades of life, suggesting that social and environmental factors may have considerable influence on disease onset. This study examined the association between the age of onset and sunlight at the location of onset. METHOD: Data were obtained from 2414 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar I disorder, according to DSM-IV criteria. Data were collected at 24 sites in 13 countries spanning latitudes 6.3 to 63.4 degrees from the equator, including data from both hemispheres. The age of onset and location of onset were obtained retrospectively, from patient records and/or direct interviews. Solar insolation data, or the amount of electromagnetic energy striking the surface of the earth, were obtained from the NASA Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) database for each location of onset. RESULTS: The larger the maximum monthly increase in solar insolation at the location of onset, the younger the age of onset (coefficient= -4.724, 95% CI: -8.124 to -1.323, p=0.006), controlling for each country's median age. The maximum monthly increase in solar insolation occurred in springtime. No relationships were found between the age of onset and latitude, yearly total solar insolation, and the maximum monthly decrease in solar insolation. The largest maximum monthly increases in solar insolation occurred in diverse environments, including Norway, arid areas in California, and Chile. CONCLUSION: The large maximum monthly increase in sunlight in springtime may have an important influence on the onset of bipolar disorder.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=22612720&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3525652/pdf/nihms2451.pdf
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAge of Onset
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subjectBipolar Disorder
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectGeography, Medical
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subject*Photoperiod
dc.subjectRetrospective Studies
dc.subjectSeasons
dc.subject*Solar Energy
dc.subject*Sunlight
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleImpact of sunlight on the age of onset of bipolar disorder
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleBipolar disorders
dc.source.volume14
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_pp/599
dc.identifier.contextkey3660333
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVE: Although bipolar disorder has high heritability, the onset occurs during several decades of life, suggesting that social and environmental factors may have considerable influence on disease onset. This study examined the association between the age of onset and sunlight at the location of onset.</p> <p>METHOD: Data were obtained from 2414 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar I disorder, according to DSM-IV criteria. Data were collected at 24 sites in 13 countries spanning latitudes 6.3 to 63.4 degrees from the equator, including data from both hemispheres. The age of onset and location of onset were obtained retrospectively, from patient records and/or direct interviews. Solar insolation data, or the amount of electromagnetic energy striking the surface of the earth, were obtained from the NASA Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) database for each location of onset.</p> <p>RESULTS: The larger the maximum monthly increase in solar insolation at the location of onset, the younger the age of onset (coefficient= -4.724, 95% CI: -8.124 to -1.323, p=0.006), controlling for each country's median age. The maximum monthly increase in solar insolation occurred in springtime. No relationships were found between the age of onset and latitude, yearly total solar insolation, and the maximum monthly decrease in solar insolation. The largest maximum monthly increases in solar insolation occurred in diverse environments, including Norway, arid areas in California, and Chile.</p> <p>CONCLUSION: The large maximum monthly increase in sunlight in springtime may have an important influence on the onset of bipolar disorder.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_pp/599
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pages654-63


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