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dc.contributor.authorLiso Navarro, Ana A.
dc.contributor.authorSikoglu, Elif M.
dc.contributor.authorHeinze, Cailin R.
dc.contributor.authorRogan, Ryan C.
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Vivienne A.
dc.contributor.authorKing, Jean A.
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Constance M.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:29.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:10:47Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:10:47Z
dc.date.issued2014-08-15
dc.date.submitted2014-09-16
dc.identifier.citationBehav Brain Res. 2014 Aug 15;270:240-7. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2014.05.013. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2014.05.013">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0166-4328 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbr.2014.05.013
dc.identifier.pmid24855038
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/46122
dc.description.abstractAttention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder affecting 5-10% of children. One of the suggested mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of ADHD is insufficient energy supply to neurons. Here, we investigated the role of omega 3 fatty acids in altering neural energy metabolism and behavior of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), which is an animal model of ADHD. To this end, we employed Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) to evaluate changes in brain neurochemistry in the SHR following consumption of one of three experimental diets (starting PND 21): fish oil enriched (FOE), regular (RD) and animal fat enriched (AFE) diet. Behavioral tests were performed to evaluate differences in locomotor activity and risk-taking behavior (starting PND 44). Comparison of frontal lobe metabolites showed that increased amounts of omega 3 fatty acids decreased total Creatine levels (tCr), but did not change Glutamate (Glu), total N-Acetylaspartate (tNAA), Lactate (Lac), Choline (Cho) or Inositol (Ino) levels. Although behavior was not significantly affected by different diets, significant correlations were observed between brain metabolites and behavior in the open field and elevated plus maze. SHR with higher levels of brain tCr and Glu exhibited greater hyperactivity in a familiar environment. On the other hand, risk-taking exploration of the elevated plus maze's open arms correlated negatively with forebrain tNAA and Lac levels. These findings support the possible alteration in energy metabolites in ADHD, correlating with hyperactivity in the animal model. The data also suggest that omega 3 fatty acids alter brain energy and phospholipid metabolism.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=24855038&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2014.05.013
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectMolecular and Cellular Neuroscience
dc.subjectPsychiatric and Mental Health
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleEffect of diet on brain metabolites and behavior in spontaneously hypertensive rats
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleBehavioural brain research
dc.source.volume270
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_pp/659
dc.identifier.contextkey6123871
html.description.abstract<p>Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder affecting 5-10% of children. One of the suggested mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of ADHD is insufficient energy supply to neurons. Here, we investigated the role of omega 3 fatty acids in altering neural energy metabolism and behavior of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), which is an animal model of ADHD. To this end, we employed Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) to evaluate changes in brain neurochemistry in the SHR following consumption of one of three experimental diets (starting PND 21): fish oil enriched (FOE), regular (RD) and animal fat enriched (AFE) diet. Behavioral tests were performed to evaluate differences in locomotor activity and risk-taking behavior (starting PND 44). Comparison of frontal lobe metabolites showed that increased amounts of omega 3 fatty acids decreased total Creatine levels (tCr), but did not change Glutamate (Glu), total N-Acetylaspartate (tNAA), Lactate (Lac), Choline (Cho) or Inositol (Ino) levels. Although behavior was not significantly affected by different diets, significant correlations were observed between brain metabolites and behavior in the open field and elevated plus maze. SHR with higher levels of brain tCr and Glu exhibited greater hyperactivity in a familiar environment. On the other hand, risk-taking exploration of the elevated plus maze's open arms correlated negatively with forebrain tNAA and Lac levels. These findings support the possible alteration in energy metabolites in ADHD, correlating with hyperactivity in the animal model. The data also suggest that omega 3 fatty acids alter brain energy and phospholipid metabolism.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_pp/659
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment o fPsychiatry, Center for Comparative Neuroimaging
dc.source.pages240-7


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