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dc.contributor.authorSikoglu, Elif M.
dc.contributor.authorHeffernan, Meghan E.
dc.contributor.authorTam, Kelly
dc.contributor.authorSicard, Kenneth M.
dc.contributor.authorBratane, Bernt T.
dc.contributor.authorQuan, Meina
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Marc
dc.contributor.authorKing, Jean A.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:29.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:10:55Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:10:55Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-01
dc.date.submitted2014-09-16
dc.identifier.citationBehav Brain Res. 2014 Feb 1;259:354-6. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2013.11.008. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2013.11.008">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0166-4328 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbr.2013.11.008
dc.identifier.pmid24239694
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/46157
dc.description.abstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by neuronal damage and commonly, secondary cell death, leading to functional and neurological dysfunction. Despite the recent focus of TBI research on developing therapies, affective therapeutic strategies targeting neuronal death associated with TBI remain underexplored. This study explored the efficacy of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) as an intervention for improving cognitive deficits commonly associated with TBI. Although G-CSF has been studied with histological techniques, to date, its effects on functional outcome remain unknown. To this end, we used a closed head injury (CHI) model in Wistar rats that were randomly assigned to one of four groups (untreated TBI, G-CSF treated TBI, G-CSF treated Control, Control). The treatment groups were administered subcutaneous injections of G-CSF 30 min (120 mug/kg) and 12 h (60 mug/kg) post-trauma. The Morris Water Maze test was used to measure any treatment-associated changes in cognitive deficits observed in TBI animals at days 2-6 post-injury. Our findings demonstrate a significant improvement in cognitive performance in the G-CSF treated TBI animals within a week of injury, compared to untreated TBI, indicative of immediate and beneficial effect of G-CSF on cognitive performance post CHI. Our model suggests that early G-CSF exposure may be a promising therapeutic approach in recovery of cognitive deficits due to TBI.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=24239694&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2013.11.008
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectArea Under Curve
dc.subjectBrain Injuries
dc.subjectCognition Disorders
dc.subjectDisease Models, Animal
dc.subjectGranulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectNeuropsychological Tests
dc.subjectRats
dc.subjectRats, Wistar
dc.subjectRecovery of Function
dc.subjectTime Factors
dc.subjectBehavioral Neurobiology
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectNervous System Diseases
dc.subjectNeurology
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleEnhancement in cognitive function recovery by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in a rodent model of traumatic brain injury
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleBehavioural brain research
dc.source.volume259
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_pp/692
dc.identifier.contextkey6123907
html.description.abstract<p>Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by neuronal damage and commonly, secondary cell death, leading to functional and neurological dysfunction. Despite the recent focus of TBI research on developing therapies, affective therapeutic strategies targeting neuronal death associated with TBI remain underexplored. This study explored the efficacy of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) as an intervention for improving cognitive deficits commonly associated with TBI. Although G-CSF has been studied with histological techniques, to date, its effects on functional outcome remain unknown. To this end, we used a closed head injury (CHI) model in Wistar rats that were randomly assigned to one of four groups (untreated TBI, G-CSF treated TBI, G-CSF treated Control, Control). The treatment groups were administered subcutaneous injections of G-CSF 30 min (120 mug/kg) and 12 h (60 mug/kg) post-trauma. The Morris Water Maze test was used to measure any treatment-associated changes in cognitive deficits observed in TBI animals at days 2-6 post-injury. Our findings demonstrate a significant improvement in cognitive performance in the G-CSF treated TBI animals within a week of injury, compared to untreated TBI, indicative of immediate and beneficial effect of G-CSF on cognitive performance post CHI. Our model suggests that early G-CSF exposure may be a promising therapeutic approach in recovery of cognitive deficits due to TBI.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_pp/692
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neurology
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pages354-6


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