Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRandall, Melinda
dc.contributor.authorLowe, Marissa
dc.contributor.authorAillon-Sohl, Lara
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:30.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:11:24Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:11:24Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-01
dc.date.submitted2017-04-24
dc.identifier.citationJ Ment Health. 2016;25(2):122-5. Oct 15. <a href="https://doi.org/10.3109/09638237.2015.1078885">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0963-8237 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/09638237.2015.1078885
dc.identifier.pmid26472154
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/46271
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Understanding how psychiatry residents learn to prescribe is important for the future of psychiatry. Prescribing is a complicated act that involves much more than signing a prescription. During residency, psychiatrists develop seminal attitudes and habits about prescribing. There have been no published studies focusing on psychiatry residents' experience when learning to prescribe. AIMS: Qualitative methodology lends itself to a deep exploration of the process of learning how to prescribe. We undertook a qualitative study questioning psychiatry residents about their prescribing. METHODS: Psychiatry residents were recruited from three residency programs and focus groups were conducted at each program. The focus groups were audiotaped and transcribed by a professional service. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data and triangulation to increase the rigor of the study. RESULTS: A total of 12 residents participated. Three themes were identified concerning identity development as a psychiatrist, uncertainty and fear about prescribing, and the centrality of collaborating with the patient during the prescribing process. CONCLUSION: Psychiatry residents struggle with significant anxiety and frustration in their experience of learning to prescribe, suggesting a place for mentors and supervisors to focus.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=26472154&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.3109/09638237.2015.1078885
dc.subjectGraduate medical education
dc.subjectpsychopharmacology
dc.subjectqualitative research
dc.subjectMedical Education
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleWhat is the experience of psychiatry residents learning to prescribe? A qualitative research inquiry
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of mental health (Abingdon, England)
dc.source.volume25
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_pp/807
dc.identifier.contextkey10064864
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: Understanding how psychiatry residents learn to prescribe is important for the future of psychiatry. Prescribing is a complicated act that involves much more than signing a prescription. During residency, psychiatrists develop seminal attitudes and habits about prescribing. There have been no published studies focusing on psychiatry residents' experience when learning to prescribe.</p> <p>AIMS: Qualitative methodology lends itself to a deep exploration of the process of learning how to prescribe. We undertook a qualitative study questioning psychiatry residents about their prescribing.</p> <p>METHODS: Psychiatry residents were recruited from three residency programs and focus groups were conducted at each program. The focus groups were audiotaped and transcribed by a professional service. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data and triangulation to increase the rigor of the study.</p> <p>RESULTS: A total of 12 residents participated. Three themes were identified concerning identity development as a psychiatrist, uncertainty and fear about prescribing, and the centrality of collaborating with the patient during the prescribing process.</p> <p>CONCLUSION: Psychiatry residents struggle with significant anxiety and frustration in their experience of learning to prescribe, suggesting a place for mentors and supervisors to focus.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_pp/807
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pages122-5


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record