Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAngner, Erik
dc.contributor.authorHullett, Sandral
dc.contributor.authorAllison, Jeroan J.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:33.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:12:34Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:12:34Z
dc.date.issued2011-06-15
dc.date.submitted2012-04-16
dc.identifier.citationJ Econ Psychol. 2011 Jun;32(3):357-366. DOI 10.1016/j.joep.2011.01.002
dc.identifier.issn0167-4870 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.joep.2011.01.002
dc.identifier.pmid21666864
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/46534
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the association between John Henryism - a behavioral predisposition to cope actively with psychosocial environmental stressors - and happiness. On the basis of previous research on aspiration and goal regulation, we predicted that John Henryism would be negatively associated with happiness when controlling for demographic factors and attainment in various domains of life. We tested the prediction in a sample of hypertensive participants (n=758) drawn from an inner-city, mainly African-American, safety-net hospital in Jefferson County, Alabama. Bivariate analysis revealed no association between John Henryism and attainment in six domains of life: marriage, children, education, employment, income, and health. However, a significant negative association between John Henryism and happiness was found both in bivariate analysis (Spearman's rho= -0.335; p
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=21666864&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3109756/pdf/nihms277463.pdf
dc.subjectHappiness
dc.subjectForecasting
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.title"I'll Die with the Hammer in My Hand": John Henryism as a Predictor of Happiness
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleJournal Of Economic Psychology
dc.source.volume32
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/1001
dc.identifier.contextkey2767204
html.description.abstract<p>This paper examines the association between John Henryism - a behavioral predisposition to cope actively with psychosocial environmental stressors - and happiness. On the basis of previous research on aspiration and goal regulation, we predicted that John Henryism would be negatively associated with happiness when controlling for demographic factors and attainment in various domains of life. We tested the prediction in a sample of hypertensive participants (n=758) drawn from an inner-city, mainly African-American, safety-net hospital in Jefferson County, Alabama. Bivariate analysis revealed no association between John Henryism and attainment in six domains of life: marriage, children, education, employment, income, and health. However, a significant negative association between John Henryism and happiness was found both in bivariate analysis (Spearman's rho= -0.335; p</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/1001
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages357-366


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record