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dc.contributor.authorEdmond, Sara N.
dc.contributor.authorBecker, William C.
dc.contributor.authorDriscoll, Mary A.
dc.contributor.authorDecker, Suzanne E.
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, Diana M.
dc.contributor.authorMattocks, Kristin M.
dc.contributor.authorKerns, Robert D.
dc.contributor.authorHaskell, Sally G.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:35.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:13:28Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:13:28Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-01
dc.date.submitted2018-06-27
dc.identifier.citation<p>J Gen Intern Med. 2018 May;33(Suppl 1):54-60. doi: 10.1007/s11606-018-4322-0. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-018-4322-0">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn0884-8734 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11606-018-4322-0
dc.identifier.pmid29633141
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/46734
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Despite strong evidence for the effectiveness of non-pharmacological pain treatment modalities (NPMs), little is known about the prevalence or correlates of NPM use. OBJECTIVE: This study examined rates and correlates of NPM use in a sample of veterans who served during recent conflicts. DESIGN: We examined rates and demographic and clinical correlates of self-reported NPM use (operationalized as psychological/behavioral therapies, exercise/movement therapies, and manual therapies). We calculated descriptive statistics and examined bivariate associations and multivariable associations using logistic regression. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were 460 veterans endorsing pain lasting > /= 3 months who completed the baseline survey of the Women Veterans Cohort Study (response rate 7.7%. MAIN MEASURES: Outcome was self-reported use of NPMs in the past 12 months. KEY RESULTS: Veterans were 33.76 years old (SD = 10.72), 56.3% female, and 80.2% White. Regarding NPM use, 22.6% reported using psychological/behavioral, 50.9% used exercise/movement and 51.7% used manual therapies. Veterans with a college degree (vs. no degree; OR = 2.51, 95% CI = 1.46, 4.30, p = 0.001) or those with worse mental health symptoms (OR = 2.88, 95% CI = 2.11, 3.93, p < 0.001) were more likely to use psychological/behavioral therapies. Veterans who were female (OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.43, 0.93, p = 0.02) or who used non-opioid pain medications (OR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.146, 2.84, p = 0.009) were more likely to use exercise/movement therapies. Veterans who were non-White (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.5, 0.94, p = 0.03), with greater educational attainment (OR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.42, 3.15, p < 0.001), or who used non-opioid pain medication (OR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.09, 2.68, p = 0.02) were more likely to use manual therapies. CONCLUSIONS: Results identified demographic and clinical characteristics among different NPMs, which may indicate differences in veteran treatment preferences or provider referral patterns. Further study of provider referral patterns and veteran treatment preferences is needed to inform interventions to increase NPM utilization. Research is also need to identify demographic and clinical correlates of clinical outcomes related to NPM use.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=29633141&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-018-4322-0
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectMilitary and Veterans Studies
dc.subjectMovement and Mind-Body Therapies
dc.subjectPain Management
dc.subjectPathological Conditions, Signs and Symptoms
dc.subjectPsychological Phenomena and Processes
dc.subjectTherapeutics
dc.titleUse of Non-Pharmacological Pain Treatment Modalities Among Veterans with Chronic Pain: Results from a Cross-Sectional Survey
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of general internal medicine
dc.source.volume33
dc.source.issueSuppl 1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/1193
dc.identifier.contextkey12399211
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: Despite strong evidence for the effectiveness of non-pharmacological pain treatment modalities (NPMs), little is known about the prevalence or correlates of NPM use.</p> <p>OBJECTIVE: This study examined rates and correlates of NPM use in a sample of veterans who served during recent conflicts.</p> <p>DESIGN: We examined rates and demographic and clinical correlates of self-reported NPM use (operationalized as psychological/behavioral therapies, exercise/movement therapies, and manual therapies). We calculated descriptive statistics and examined bivariate associations and multivariable associations using logistic regression.</p> <p>PARTICIPANTS: Participants were 460 veterans endorsing pain lasting > /= 3 months who completed the baseline survey of the Women Veterans Cohort Study (response rate 7.7%.</p> <p>MAIN MEASURES: Outcome was self-reported use of NPMs in the past 12 months.</p> <p>KEY RESULTS: Veterans were 33.76 years old (SD = 10.72), 56.3% female, and 80.2% White. Regarding NPM use, 22.6% reported using psychological/behavioral, 50.9% used exercise/movement and 51.7% used manual therapies. Veterans with a college degree (vs. no degree; OR = 2.51, 95% CI = 1.46, 4.30, p = 0.001) or those with worse mental health symptoms (OR = 2.88, 95% CI = 2.11, 3.93, p < 0.001) were more likely to use psychological/behavioral therapies. Veterans who were female (OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.43, 0.93, p = 0.02) or who used non-opioid pain medications (OR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.146, 2.84, p = 0.009) were more likely to use exercise/movement therapies. Veterans who were non-White (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.5, 0.94, p = 0.03), with greater educational attainment (OR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.42, 3.15, p < 0.001), or who used non-opioid pain medication (OR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.09, 2.68, p = 0.02) were more likely to use manual therapies.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Results identified demographic and clinical characteristics among different NPMs, which may indicate differences in veteran treatment preferences or provider referral patterns. Further study of provider referral patterns and veteran treatment preferences is needed to inform interventions to increase NPM utilization. Research is also need to identify demographic and clinical correlates of clinical outcomes related to NPM use.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/1193
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages54-60


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