Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWiltshire, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.authorAllison, Jeroan J.
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Roger
dc.contributor.authorElder, Keith
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:35.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:13:33Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:13:33Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-16
dc.date.submitted2018-11-08
dc.identifier.citation<p>AIMS Public Health. 2018 May 16;5(2):122-134. doi: 10.3934/publichealth.2018.2.122. eCollection 2018. <a href="https://doi.org/10.3934/publichealth.2018.2.122">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn2327-8994 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.3934/publichealth.2018.2.122
dc.identifier.pmid30094275
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/46755
dc.description.abstractBackground/Objective: Physical concordance between physicians and patients is advocated as a solution to improve trust and health outcomes for racial/ethnic minorities, but the empirical evidence is mixed. We assessed women's perceptions of physician trustworthiness based on physician physical characteristics and context of medical visit. Methods: A factorial survey design was used in which a community-based sample of 313 African American (AA) women aged 45+ years responded to vignettes of contrived medical visits (routine versus serious medical concern visit) where the physician's race/ethnicity, gender, and age were randomly manipulated. Eight physician profiles were generated. General linear mixed modeling was used to assess separately and as an index, trust items of fidelity, honesty, competence, confidentiality, and global trust. Trust scores were based on a scale of 1 to 5, with higher scores indicating higher trust. Mean scores and effect sizes (ES) were used to assess magnitude of trust ratings. Results: No significant differences were observed on the index of trust by physician profile characteristics or by medical visit context. However, the white-older-male was rated higher than the AA-older-female on fidelity (4.23 vs. 4.02; ES = 0.215, 95% CI: 0.001-0.431), competence (4.23 vs. 3.95; ES = 0.278, 95% CI: 0.062-0.494) and honesty (4.39 vs. 4.19, ES = 0.215, 95% CI: 0.001-0.431). The AA-older male was rated higher than the AA-older-female on competence (4.20 vs. 3.95; ES = 0.243, 95% CI: 0.022-0.464) and honesty (4.44 vs. 4.19; ES = 0.243, 95% CI: 0.022-0.464). The AA-young male was rated higher than AA-older-female on competence (4.16 vs. 3.95; ES = 0.205, 95% CI: 0.013-0.423). Conclusions: Concordance may hold no salience for some groups of older AA women with regards to perceived trustworthiness of a physician. Policies and programs that promote diversity in the healthcare workforce in order to reduce racial/ethnic disparities should emphasize cultural competency training for all physicians, which is important in understanding patients and to improving health outcomes.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=30094275&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rights© 2018 the Author(s), licensee AIMS Press. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAfrican Americans
dc.subjectconcordance
dc.subjecttrust in physicians
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectGender, Race, Sexuality, and Ethnicity in Communication
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titleAfrican American women perceptions of physician trustworthiness: A factorial survey analysis of physician race, gender and age
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAIMS public health
dc.source.volume5
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2217&amp;context=qhs_pp&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/1216
dc.identifier.contextkey13269220
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T17:13:34Z
html.description.abstract<p>Background/Objective: Physical concordance between physicians and patients is advocated as a solution to improve trust and health outcomes for racial/ethnic minorities, but the empirical evidence is mixed. We assessed women's perceptions of physician trustworthiness based on physician physical characteristics and context of medical visit.</p> <p>Methods: A factorial survey design was used in which a community-based sample of 313 African American (AA) women aged 45+ years responded to vignettes of contrived medical visits (routine versus serious medical concern visit) where the physician's race/ethnicity, gender, and age were randomly manipulated. Eight physician profiles were generated. General linear mixed modeling was used to assess separately and as an index, trust items of fidelity, honesty, competence, confidentiality, and global trust. Trust scores were based on a scale of 1 to 5, with higher scores indicating higher trust. Mean scores and effect sizes (ES) were used to assess magnitude of trust ratings.</p> <p>Results: No significant differences were observed on the index of trust by physician profile characteristics or by medical visit context. However, the white-older-male was rated higher than the AA-older-female on fidelity (4.23 vs. 4.02; ES = 0.215, 95% CI: 0.001-0.431), competence (4.23 vs. 3.95; ES = 0.278, 95% CI: 0.062-0.494) and honesty (4.39 vs. 4.19, ES = 0.215, 95% CI: 0.001-0.431). The AA-older male was rated higher than the AA-older-female on competence (4.20 vs. 3.95; ES = 0.243, 95% CI: 0.022-0.464) and honesty (4.44 vs. 4.19; ES = 0.243, 95% CI: 0.022-0.464). The AA-young male was rated higher than AA-older-female on competence (4.16 vs. 3.95; ES = 0.205, 95% CI: 0.013-0.423).</p> <p>Conclusions: Concordance may hold no salience for some groups of older AA women with regards to perceived trustworthiness of a physician. Policies and programs that promote diversity in the healthcare workforce in order to reduce racial/ethnic disparities should emphasize cultural competency training for all physicians, which is important in understanding patients and to improving health outcomes.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/1216
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages122-134


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
publichealth_05_02_122.pdf
Size:
468.1Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2018 the Author(s), licensee AIMS Press. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 the Author(s), licensee AIMS Press. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)