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dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Nancy P.
dc.contributor.authorClark, Melissa A.
dc.contributor.authorKenney, Shannon R.
dc.contributor.authorDiGuiseppi, Graham
dc.contributor.authorMeisel, Matthew K.
dc.contributor.authorBalestrieri, Sara
dc.contributor.authorOtt, Miles Q.
dc.contributor.authorLight, John
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:35.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:13:38Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:13:38Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-01
dc.date.submitted2019-01-23
dc.identifier.citation<p>Contemp Clin Trials. 2019 Jan;76:16-23. doi: 10.1016/j.cct.2018.10.015. Epub 2018 Nov 1. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2018.10.015">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1551-7144 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cct.2018.10.015
dc.identifier.pmid30391343
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/46774
dc.description.abstractHeavy drinking and its consequences among college students represent a serious public health problem, and peer social networks are a robust predictor of drinking-related risk behaviors. In a recent trial, we administered a Brief Motivational Intervention (BMI) to a small number of first-year college students to assess the indirect effects of the intervention on peers not receiving the intervention. OBJECTIVES: To present the research design, describe the methods used to successfully enroll a high proportion of a first-year college class network, and document participant characteristics. METHODS: Prior to study enrollment, we consulted with a student advisory group and campus stakeholders to aid in the development of study-related procedures. Enrollment and baseline procedures were completed in the first six weeks of the academic semester. Surveys assessed demographics, alcohol use, and social network ties. Individuals were assigned to a BMI or control group according to their dormitory location. RESULTS: The majority of incoming first-year students (1342/1660; 81%) were enrolled (55% female, 52% nonwhite, mean age 18.6 [SD=0.51]). Differences between the intervention and control group were noted in alcohol use, but were in large part a function of there being more substance-free dormitory floors in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: The current study was successful in enrolling a large proportion of a first-year college class and can serve as a template for social network investigations.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=30391343&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2018.10.015
dc.subjectAlcohol
dc.subjectCollege
dc.subjectImplementation
dc.subjectIntervention
dc.subjectSocial network
dc.subjectStudy design
dc.subjectBehavior and Behavior Mechanisms
dc.subjectHealth Psychology
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectSociology
dc.titleEnrollment and assessment of a first-year college class social network for a controlled trial of the indirect effect of a brief motivational intervention
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleContemporary clinical trials
dc.source.volume76
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/1233
dc.identifier.contextkey13667579
html.description.abstract<p>Heavy drinking and its consequences among college students represent a serious public health problem, and peer social networks are a robust predictor of drinking-related risk behaviors. In a recent trial, we administered a Brief Motivational Intervention (BMI) to a small number of first-year college students to assess the indirect effects of the intervention on peers not receiving the intervention.</p> <p>OBJECTIVES: To present the research design, describe the methods used to successfully enroll a high proportion of a first-year college class network, and document participant characteristics.</p> <p>METHODS: Prior to study enrollment, we consulted with a student advisory group and campus stakeholders to aid in the development of study-related procedures. Enrollment and baseline procedures were completed in the first six weeks of the academic semester. Surveys assessed demographics, alcohol use, and social network ties. Individuals were assigned to a BMI or control group according to their dormitory location.</p> <p>RESULTS: The majority of incoming first-year students (1342/1660; 81%) were enrolled (55% female, 52% nonwhite, mean age 18.6 [SD=0.51]). Differences between the intervention and control group were noted in alcohol use, but were in large part a function of there being more substance-free dormitory floors in the control group.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: The current study was successful in enrolling a large proportion of a first-year college class and can serve as a template for social network investigations.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/1233
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages16-23


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