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dc.contributor.authorLee, Megan
dc.contributor.authorSnow, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorQuon, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorSelander, Kim
dc.contributor.authorDeRycke, Eric
dc.contributor.authorLawless, Mark
dc.contributor.authorDriscoll, Mary
dc.contributor.authorDitre, Joseph W.
dc.contributor.authorMattocks, Kristin M.
dc.contributor.authorBecker, William C.
dc.contributor.authorBastian, Lori A.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:37.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:14:32Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:14:32Z
dc.date.issued2021-10-01
dc.date.submitted2021-11-15
dc.identifier.citation<p>Lee M, Snow J, Quon C, Selander K, DeRycke E, Lawless M, Driscoll M, Ditre JW, Mattocks KM, Becker WC, Bastian LA. I smoke to cope with pain: patients' perspectives on the link between cigarette smoking and pain. Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2021 Oct;133(19-20):1012-1019. doi: 10.1007/s00508-021-01931-x. Epub 2021 Aug 30. PMID: 34460005. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s00508-021-01931-x">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn0043-5325 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00508-021-01931-x
dc.identifier.pmid34460005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/46977
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: For people with chronic pain, cigarette smoking is associated with greater pain intensity and impairment. Researchers have hypothesized a reciprocal relationship in which pain and smoking exacerbate each other, resulting in greater pain and increased smoking. This study aimed to qualitatively examine patient perspectives on this association. METHODS: A retrospective thematic analysis of smoking cessation counseling notes for 136 veterans in the Pain and Smoking Study, a tailored smoking cessation trial, was conducted. A validated codebook was applied to each counseling note by four independent coders using Atlas.ti (Atlas.ti, Berlin, Germany). Coders participated in a consensus-forming exercise with salient themes validated among the wider research team. KEY RESULTS: Participants averaged 60 years of age (range 28-77 years) and were 9% female. The median number of cigarettes smoked per day was 15, with a mean pain intensity score in the last week (from 0-10) of 5.1. While not all patients acknowledged a connection between pain and smoking, we found that (1) pain motivates smoking and helps manage pain-related distress, as a coping strategy and through cognitive distraction, and (2) pain motivates smoking but smoking does not offer pain relief. Concerns about managing pain without smoking was identified as a notable barrier to cessation. CONCLUSION: Many patients with chronic pain who smoke readily identified pain as a motivator of their smoking behavior and are reluctant to quit for this reason. Integrated interventions for smokers with pain should address these perceptions and expectancies and promote uptake of more adaptive self-management strategies for pain.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=34460005&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rightsCopyright © 2021, This is a U.S. Government work and not under copyright protection in the US; foreign copyright protection may apply
dc.subjectChronic pain
dc.subjectCoping strategy
dc.subjectQualitative research
dc.subjectSmoking cessation
dc.subjectTobacco
dc.subjectPain Management
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.subjectSubstance Abuse and Addiction
dc.titleI smoke to cope with pain: patients' perspectives on the link between cigarette smoking and pain
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleWiener klinische Wochenschrift
dc.source.volume133
dc.source.issue19-20
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2460&amp;context=qhs_pp&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/1456
dc.identifier.contextkey25927947
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T17:14:32Z
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: For people with chronic pain, cigarette smoking is associated with greater pain intensity and impairment. Researchers have hypothesized a reciprocal relationship in which pain and smoking exacerbate each other, resulting in greater pain and increased smoking. This study aimed to qualitatively examine patient perspectives on this association.</p> <p>METHODS: A retrospective thematic analysis of smoking cessation counseling notes for 136 veterans in the Pain and Smoking Study, a tailored smoking cessation trial, was conducted. A validated codebook was applied to each counseling note by four independent coders using Atlas.ti (Atlas.ti, Berlin, Germany). Coders participated in a consensus-forming exercise with salient themes validated among the wider research team.</p> <p>KEY RESULTS: Participants averaged 60 years of age (range 28-77 years) and were 9% female. The median number of cigarettes smoked per day was 15, with a mean pain intensity score in the last week (from 0-10) of 5.1. While not all patients acknowledged a connection between pain and smoking, we found that (1) pain motivates smoking and helps manage pain-related distress, as a coping strategy and through cognitive distraction, and (2) pain motivates smoking but smoking does not offer pain relief. Concerns about managing pain without smoking was identified as a notable barrier to cessation.</p> <p>CONCLUSION: Many patients with chronic pain who smoke readily identified pain as a motivator of their smoking behavior and are reluctant to quit for this reason. Integrated interventions for smokers with pain should address these perceptions and expectancies and promote uptake of more adaptive self-management strategies for pain.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/1456
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages1012-1019


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