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dc.contributor.authorMoormann, Ann M.
dc.contributor.authorChelimo, Kiprotich
dc.contributor.authorSumba, Peter Odada
dc.contributor.authorTisch, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.authorRochford, Rosemary A.
dc.contributor.authorKazura, James W.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:40.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:15:49Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:15:49Z
dc.date.issued2007-02-15
dc.date.submitted2010-06-08
dc.identifier.citationJ Infect Dis. 2007 Mar 15;195(6):799-808. Epub 2007 Feb 6. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/511984">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0022-1899 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/511984
dc.identifier.pmid17299709
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47254
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Malaria and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection are cofactors in the pathogenesis of endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL). The mechanisms by which these pathogens predispose to eBL are not known. METHODS: Healthy Kenyan children with divergent malaria exposure were measured for responses to EBV latent and lytic antigens by interferon (IFN)- gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay and interleukin (IL)-10 ELISA. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA), purified protein derivative (PPD), and T cell epitope peptides derived from merozoite surface protein (MSP)-1, a malaria blood-stage antigen, were also evaluated. RESULTS: Children 5-9 years old living in an area holoendemic for malaria had significantly fewer EBV-specific IFN- gamma responses than did children of the same age living in an area with unstable malaria transmission. This effect was not observed for children <5 years old or those >9 years old. In contrast, IFN- gamma responses to PHA, PPD, and Plasmodium falciparum MSP-1 peptides did not significantly differ by age. IL-10 responses to EBV lytic antigens, PPD, and PHA correlated inversely with malaria exposure regardless of age. CONCLUSIONS: Children living in malaria-holoendemic areas have diminished EBV-specific T cell immunosurveillance between the ages of 5 and 9 years, which coincides with the peak age incidence of eBL.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=17299709&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.rights© 2007 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectBurkitt Lymphoma
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subjectHerpesvirus 4, Human
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectKenya
dc.subjectMalaria, Falciparum
dc.subjectPlasmodium falciparum
dc.subjectT-Lymphocytes
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectImmunology and Infectious Disease
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.titleExposure to holoendemic malaria results in suppression of Epstein-Barr virus-specific T cell immunosurveillance in Kenyan children
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal of infectious diseases
dc.source.volume195
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1397&amp;context=qhs_pp&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/397
dc.identifier.contextkey1347928
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T17:15:49Z
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: Malaria and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection are cofactors in the pathogenesis of endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL). The mechanisms by which these pathogens predispose to eBL are not known.</p> <p>METHODS: Healthy Kenyan children with divergent malaria exposure were measured for responses to EBV latent and lytic antigens by interferon (IFN)- gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay and interleukin (IL)-10 ELISA. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA), purified protein derivative (PPD), and T cell epitope peptides derived from merozoite surface protein (MSP)-1, a malaria blood-stage antigen, were also evaluated.</p> <p>RESULTS: Children 5-9 years old living in an area holoendemic for malaria had significantly fewer EBV-specific IFN- gamma responses than did children of the same age living in an area with unstable malaria transmission. This effect was not observed for children <5 years old or those >9 years old. In contrast, IFN- gamma responses to PHA, PPD, and Plasmodium falciparum MSP-1 peptides did not significantly differ by age. IL-10 responses to EBV lytic antigens, PPD, and PHA correlated inversely with malaria exposure regardless of age.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Children living in malaria-holoendemic areas have diminished EBV-specific T cell immunosurveillance between the ages of 5 and 9 years, which coincides with the peak age incidence of eBL.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/397
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages799-808


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