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dc.contributor.authorRainey, Jeanette J.
dc.contributor.authorRochford, Rosemary A.
dc.contributor.authorSumba, Peter Odada
dc.contributor.authorKowuor, Dickens
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Mark L.
dc.contributor.authorMoormann, Ann M.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:40.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:15:51Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:15:51Z
dc.date.issued2008-02-08
dc.date.submitted2010-06-08
dc.identifier.citationAm J Trop Med Hyg. 2008 Feb;78(2):338-43. <a href="http://www.ajtmh.org/cgi/reprint/78/2/338">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0002-9637 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid18256442
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47260
dc.description.abstractEndemic Burkitt's lymphoma (eBL) has been linked to Epstein-Barr virus and holoendemic Plasmodium falciparum malaria. These co-infections, however, are insufficient to explain the non-random occurrence of Endemic Burkitt's lymphoma within Equatorial Africa. To explore whether this distribution could be explained by household characteristics and family environment, we conducted a case-control study using 41 hospitalized incident endemic Burkitt's lymphoma cases and 91 healthy controls identified through a population-based multistage cluster-sampling scheme in Nyanza Province, Kenya. In a multivariate analysis, odds ratios associated with having one, two, and three or more younger siblings compared with none were 0.28 (90% CI: 0.09, 0.83), 0.59 (90% CI: 0.16, 2.23) and 0.15 (90% CI: 0.03, 0.67) respectively, suggesting that children with endemic Burkitt's lymphoma were more likely than controls to be last-born. Children with endemic Burkitt's lymphoma were also more likely to live in non-monogamous families (OR=3.12, 90% CI:1.19, 8.17) and to have at least one deceased parent (OR=3.38, 90% CI: 1.18, 9.64). Household characteristics, especially sibship relationships, may contribute to endemic Burkitt's lymphoma and therefore warrant further study.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=18256442&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.rightsCopyright © 2008 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectBurkitt Lymphoma
dc.subjectCase-Control Studies
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subject*Endemic Diseases
dc.subject*Family Characteristics
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHousing
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectKenya
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectOdds Ratio
dc.subjectRisk Factors
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectImmunology and Infectious Disease
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.titleFamily environment is associated with endemic Burkitt lymphoma: a population-based case-control study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
dc.source.volume78
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1401&amp;context=qhs_pp&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/401
dc.identifier.contextkey1347932
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T17:15:51Z
html.description.abstract<p>Endemic Burkitt's lymphoma (eBL) has been linked to Epstein-Barr virus and holoendemic Plasmodium falciparum malaria. These co-infections, however, are insufficient to explain the non-random occurrence of Endemic Burkitt's lymphoma within Equatorial Africa. To explore whether this distribution could be explained by household characteristics and family environment, we conducted a case-control study using 41 hospitalized incident endemic Burkitt's lymphoma cases and 91 healthy controls identified through a population-based multistage cluster-sampling scheme in Nyanza Province, Kenya. In a multivariate analysis, odds ratios associated with having one, two, and three or more younger siblings compared with none were 0.28 (90% CI: 0.09, 0.83), 0.59 (90% CI: 0.16, 2.23) and 0.15 (90% CI: 0.03, 0.67) respectively, suggesting that children with endemic Burkitt's lymphoma were more likely than controls to be last-born. Children with endemic Burkitt's lymphoma were also more likely to live in non-monogamous families (OR=3.12, 90% CI:1.19, 8.17) and to have at least one deceased parent (OR=3.38, 90% CI: 1.18, 9.64). Household characteristics, especially sibship relationships, may contribute to endemic Burkitt's lymphoma and therefore warrant further study.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/401
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages338-43


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