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dc.contributor.authorPiriou, Erwan
dc.contributor.authorKimmel, Rhonda
dc.contributor.authorChelimo, Kiprotich
dc.contributor.authorMiddeldorp, Jaap M.
dc.contributor.authorSumba, Peter Odada
dc.contributor.authorPloutz-Snyder, Robert
dc.contributor.authorMoormann, Ann M.
dc.contributor.authorRochford, Rosemary A.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:40.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:15:53Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:15:53Z
dc.date.issued2009-04-22
dc.date.submitted2010-06-08
dc.identifier.citationJ Med Virol. 2009 Jun;81(6):1088-93. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21485">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0146-6615 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jmv.21485
dc.identifier.pmid19382256
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47268
dc.description.abstractTo study the long term the effects of chronic exposure to P. falciparum malaria on Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation in children, EBV-specific antibody levels were measured in a cross-sectional survey of two groups of Kenyan children with divergent malaria exposure, varying in age from 1 to 14 years. A total of 169 children were analyzed within three age groups (1-4 years, 5-9 years and 10-14 years). Using a Luminex assay, elevated levels of IgG to EBV lytic and latent antigens were observed in children from the holoendemic malaria area; these remained elevated for each age group studied. In comparison, children from the sporadic malaria area had lower levels of EBV-specific IgG antibodies and these levels declined across age groups. These data suggest that chronic exposure to malaria may lead to long-term EBV reactivation.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=19382256&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21485
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAntibodies, Viral
dc.subjectAntigens, Viral
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studies
dc.subjectEpstein-Barr Virus Infections
dc.subjectHerpesvirus 4, Human
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectImmunoglobulin G
dc.subjectInfant
dc.subjectKenya
dc.subjectMalaria
dc.subject*Virus Activation
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectImmunology and Infectious Disease
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.titleSerological evidence for long-term Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in children living in a holoendemic malaria region of Kenya
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of medical virology
dc.source.volume81
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/409
dc.identifier.contextkey1347940
html.description.abstract<p>To study the long term the effects of chronic exposure to P. falciparum malaria on Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation in children, EBV-specific antibody levels were measured in a cross-sectional survey of two groups of Kenyan children with divergent malaria exposure, varying in age from 1 to 14 years. A total of 169 children were analyzed within three age groups (1-4 years, 5-9 years and 10-14 years). Using a Luminex assay, elevated levels of IgG to EBV lytic and latent antigens were observed in children from the holoendemic malaria area; these remained elevated for each age group studied. In comparison, children from the sporadic malaria area had lower levels of EBV-specific IgG antibodies and these levels declined across age groups. These data suggest that chronic exposure to malaria may lead to long-term EBV reactivation.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/409
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages1088-93


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