Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Shawn A.
dc.contributor.authorWare, John E. Jr.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:40.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:15:58Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:15:58Z
dc.date.issued1976-01-11
dc.date.submitted2010-06-18
dc.identifier.citationHealth Serv Res. 1976 Winter;11(4):416-29. <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1071942/pdf/hsresearch00553-0088.pdf">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0017-9124 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid1030697
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47287
dc.description.abstractThe present research tested the hypothesis that the experience of health is hierarchically organized such that gratification of physical health needs must precede gratification of mental health needs. It was reasoned that because the nondisadvantaged possess greater resources for the gratification of health needs in general, symptoms of mental illness would be more salient for this group and thus better able to explain variance in both mental and physical illness. On the other hand, it was reasoned that symptoms of physical illness would be more salient and thus better able to explain variance in both mental and physical illness for the disadvantaged. Results of the study indicate income group differences in patterns of relationships among health variables, supporting the hypothesis and suggesting important differences in the validity of health measures across income groups. The results are related to previous findings in medical sociology, and suggestions for future research are made.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=1030697&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1071942/pdf/hsresearch00553-0088.pdf
dc.subjectActivities of Daily Living
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAffective Symptoms
dc.subjectAged
dc.subject*Attitude to Health
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subject*Income
dc.subjectMale
dc.subject*Mental Health
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectMorbidity
dc.subjectOhio
dc.subjectQuality of Life
dc.subjectRegression Analysis
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titleIncome group differences in relationships among survey measures of physical and mental health
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleHealth services research
dc.source.volume11
dc.source.issue4
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/426
dc.identifier.contextkey1363259
html.description.abstract<p>The present research tested the hypothesis that the experience of health is hierarchically organized such that gratification of physical health needs must precede gratification of mental health needs. It was reasoned that because the nondisadvantaged possess greater resources for the gratification of health needs in general, symptoms of mental illness would be more salient for this group and thus better able to explain variance in both mental and physical illness. On the other hand, it was reasoned that symptoms of physical illness would be more salient and thus better able to explain variance in both mental and physical illness for the disadvantaged. Results of the study indicate income group differences in patterns of relationships among health variables, supporting the hypothesis and suggesting important differences in the validity of health measures across income groups. The results are related to previous findings in medical sociology, and suggestions for future research are made.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/426
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages416-29


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record