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dc.contributor.authorLau, Richard R.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, H. Stephen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Linda C.
dc.contributor.authorWare, John E. Jr.
dc.contributor.authorBrook, Robert H.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:40.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:16:02Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:16:02Z
dc.date.issued1982-01-01
dc.date.submitted2010-06-18
dc.identifier.citationJ Community Health. 1982 Summer;7(4):250-61. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01318958">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0094-5145 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF01318958
dc.identifier.pmid7130445
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47303
dc.description.abstractThis study concerns the psychosocial aspects of treatment for chronically ill children. The English-speaking parents of 44 children 5-13 years of age being seen at five specialty clinics at a large county hospital in Los Angeles, and their attending physicians, were the subjects in this study. The parents were interviewed concerning their expectations for the current visit, and the doctor-patient interaction was tape-recorded. Identical categories of information were abstracted from the tape recording and from a chart review of the patients' medical records. Although parents expected 76% of the psychosocial aspects of care to be covered by the doctor, only one fourth were actually discussed in the visit. These unfulfilled expectations were associated with lower satisfaction with medical care received (r = .47, p less than 0.01). Finally, while doctors recorded about 80% of discussions of symptoms and physical examinations in the patient's medical record, they recorded only 25% of discussion of psychosocial problems.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=7130445&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01318958
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectCalifornia
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild Health Services
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subjectChronic Disease
dc.subject*Consumer Satisfaction
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMedical Records
dc.subjectOutpatient Clinics, Hospital
dc.subjectParents
dc.subject*Physician's Role
dc.subjectPhysician-Patient Relations
dc.subject*Role
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titlePsychosocial problems in chronically ill children: physician concern, parent satisfaction, and the validity of medical records
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of community health
dc.source.volume7
dc.source.issue4
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/443
dc.identifier.contextkey1363276
html.description.abstract<p>This study concerns the psychosocial aspects of treatment for chronically ill children. The English-speaking parents of 44 children 5-13 years of age being seen at five specialty clinics at a large county hospital in Los Angeles, and their attending physicians, were the subjects in this study. The parents were interviewed concerning their expectations for the current visit, and the doctor-patient interaction was tape-recorded. Identical categories of information were abstracted from the tape recording and from a chart review of the patients' medical records. Although parents expected 76% of the psychosocial aspects of care to be covered by the doctor, only one fourth were actually discussed in the visit. These unfulfilled expectations were associated with lower satisfaction with medical care received (r = .47, p less than 0.01). Finally, while doctors recorded about 80% of discussions of symptoms and physical examinations in the patient's medical record, they recorded only 25% of discussion of psychosocial problems.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/443
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages250-61


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