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dc.contributor.authorWells, Kenneth B.
dc.contributor.authorManning, Willard G. Jr.
dc.contributor.authorDuan, Naihua
dc.contributor.authorNewhouse, Joseph P.
dc.contributor.authorWare, John E. Jr.
dc.contributor.authorBenjamin, Bernadette
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:40.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:16:05Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:16:05Z
dc.date.issued1984-09-01
dc.date.submitted2010-06-18
dc.identifier.citationMed Care. 1984 Sep;22(9):783-8. <a href="http://journals.lww.com/lww-medicalcare/Abstract/1984/09000/The_Sensitivity_of_Mental_Health_Care_Use_and_Cost.1.aspx">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0025-7079 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid6492906
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47314
dc.description.abstractThe authors determined the sensitivity of estimates of the use and cost of outpatient mental health care to two methods effects: the definition of a mental health visit and strategies for allocating mental health care costs. They use data from the Rand Health Insurance Study, which has a random sample of the nonaged noninstitutionalized civilian population in six United States sites. Estimates of the use of mental health specialists are insensitive to alternative methods. However, estimates of the use and cost of the mental health care delivered by nonpsychiatrist physicians (e.g., internists) are quite sensitive to methods effects. Nevertheless, the cost of care from nonpsychiatrist physicians is so low that the total cost of outpatient mental health care is not meaningfully affected by methods effects.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=6492906&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.lww.com/lww-medicalcare/Abstract/1984/09000/The_Sensitivity_of_Mental_Health_Care_Use_and_Cost.1.aspx
dc.subjectCommunity Mental Health Services
dc.subjectCosts and Cost Analysis
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectPhysicians
dc.subjectRandom Allocation
dc.subjectSampling Studies
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectUtilization Review
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titleThe sensitivity of mental health care use and cost estimates to methods effects
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleMedical care
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.issue9
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/455
dc.identifier.contextkey1363288
html.description.abstract<p>The authors determined the sensitivity of estimates of the use and cost of outpatient mental health care to two methods effects: the definition of a mental health visit and strategies for allocating mental health care costs. They use data from the Rand Health Insurance Study, which has a random sample of the nonaged noninstitutionalized civilian population in six United States sites. Estimates of the use of mental health specialists are insensitive to alternative methods. However, estimates of the use and cost of the mental health care delivered by nonpsychiatrist physicians (e.g., internists) are quite sensitive to methods effects. Nevertheless, the cost of care from nonpsychiatrist physicians is so low that the total cost of outpatient mental health care is not meaningfully affected by methods effects.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/455
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages783-8


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