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dc.contributor.authorWells, Kenneth B.
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Charles E.
dc.contributor.authorLeake, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorWare, John E. Jr.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:40.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:16:05Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:16:05Z
dc.date.issued1984-11-23
dc.date.submitted2010-06-18
dc.identifier.citationJAMA. 1984 Nov 23-30;252(20):2846-8. <a href="http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/252/20/2846">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0098-7484 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid6492364
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47316
dc.description.abstractWe examined the relation of physicians' clinical specialty, personal health habits, and health-related beliefs to their practices in counseling about smoking, weight, exercise, and alcohol. We surveyed a random sample of members of a county medical society in selected specialties. Physicians with better personal health habits and more positive attitudes toward counseling counsel a broader range of patients and counsel more aggressively. Surgeons counsel less than nonsurgeons, even after controlling for differences in health-related attitudes and personal habits.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=6492364&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/252/20/2846
dc.subjectAlcohol Drinking
dc.subjectAttitude of Health Personnel
dc.subjectBody Weight
dc.subjectCalifornia
dc.subject*Counseling
dc.subject*Health
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subject*Life Style
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMedicine
dc.subjectPhysical Exertion
dc.subject*Physicians
dc.subjectQuestionnaires
dc.subjectRegression Analysis
dc.subjectSmoking
dc.subjectSpecialization
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titleDo physicians preach what they practice? A study of physicians' health habits and counseling practices
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association
dc.source.volume252
dc.source.issue20
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/457
dc.identifier.contextkey1363290
html.description.abstract<p>We examined the relation of physicians' clinical specialty, personal health habits, and health-related beliefs to their practices in counseling about smoking, weight, exercise, and alcohol. We surveyed a random sample of members of a county medical society in selected specialties. Physicians with better personal health habits and more positive attitudes toward counseling counsel a broader range of patients and counsel more aggressively. Surgeons counsel less than nonsurgeons, even after controlling for differences in health-related attitudes and personal habits.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/457
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages2846-8


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