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dc.contributor.authorSherbourne, Cathy Donald
dc.contributor.authorMeredith, L. S.
dc.contributor.authorRogers, William H.
dc.contributor.authorWare, John E. Jr.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:40.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:16:17Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:16:17Z
dc.date.issued1992-08-11
dc.date.submitted2010-06-18
dc.identifier.citationQual Life Res. 1992 Aug;1(4):235-46. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00435632">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0962-9343 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF00435632
dc.identifier.pmid1299454
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47364
dc.description.abstractThere is substantial evidence of individual variation in health-related quality of life measures that is not accounted for by age or disease condition. An understanding of factors that determine good health is necessary for maintained function and improved quality of life. This study examines the extent to which social support and stressful life events were more or less beneficial for the long-term physical functioning and emotional well-being of 1,402 chronically ill patients. Analyses, conducted separately in three age groups, showed that social support was beneficial for health over time regardless of age. In addition, low levels of support were particularly damaging for the physical functioning of older patients. Stressful life events impacted differentially on health-related quality of life; relationship events had an immediate effect on well-being which diminished with time; financial events had an immediate negative effect on functioning and well-being which persisted over time for middle-aged patients; bereavement had a delayed impact on quality of life, with the youngest patients especially vulnerable to its negative effects; work-related events had both negative and positive effects, depending on age group. Results reinforce the importance of identifying and dealing with psychosocial problems among patients with chronic disease.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=1299454&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00435632
dc.subjectActivities of Daily Living
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAge Factors
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectBereavement
dc.subjectChronic Disease
dc.subjectHealth Status
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectIncome
dc.subjectInterpersonal Relations
dc.subject*Life Change Events
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subject*Quality of Life
dc.subjectSampling Studies
dc.subject*Social Support
dc.subjectWork
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titleSocial support and stressful life events: age differences in their effects on health-related quality of life among the chronically ill
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleQuality of life research : an international journal of quality of life aspects of treatment, care and rehabilitation
dc.source.volume1
dc.source.issue4
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/503
dc.identifier.contextkey1363337
html.description.abstract<p>There is substantial evidence of individual variation in health-related quality of life measures that is not accounted for by age or disease condition. An understanding of factors that determine good health is necessary for maintained function and improved quality of life. This study examines the extent to which social support and stressful life events were more or less beneficial for the long-term physical functioning and emotional well-being of 1,402 chronically ill patients. Analyses, conducted separately in three age groups, showed that social support was beneficial for health over time regardless of age. In addition, low levels of support were particularly damaging for the physical functioning of older patients. Stressful life events impacted differentially on health-related quality of life; relationship events had an immediate effect on well-being which diminished with time; financial events had an immediate negative effect on functioning and well-being which persisted over time for middle-aged patients; bereavement had a delayed impact on quality of life, with the youngest patients especially vulnerable to its negative effects; work-related events had both negative and positive effects, depending on age group. Results reinforce the importance of identifying and dealing with psychosocial problems among patients with chronic disease.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/503
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages235-46


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