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dc.contributor.authorHaley, Stephen M.
dc.contributor.authorMcHorney, Colleen A.
dc.contributor.authorWare, John E. Jr.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:40.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:16:20Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:16:20Z
dc.date.issued1994-06-01
dc.date.submitted2010-06-18
dc.identifier.citationJ Clin Epidemiol. 1994 Jun;47(6):671-84. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0895-4356(94)90215-1">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0895-4356 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0895-4356(94)90215-1
dc.identifier.pmid7722580
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47374
dc.description.abstractIndexes developed to measure physical functioning as an essential component of general health status are often based on sets of hierarchically-structured items intended to represent a broad underlying concept. Rasch Item Response Theory (IRT) provides a methodology to examine the hierarchical structure, unidimensionality, and reproducibility of item positions (calibrations) along a scale. Data gathered on the 10-item Physical Functioning Scale (PF-10) from a large sample of Medical Outcomes Study patients (N = 3445) were used to examine the hierarchical order, unidimensionality, and reproducibility of item calibrations. Rasch-IRT analyses generated an empirical item hierarchy, confirmed the unidimensionality of the PF-10 for most patients, and established the reproducibility of item calibrations across patient populations and repeated tests. These findings support the content validity of the PF-10 as a measure of physical functioning and suggest that valid Rasch-IRT summary scores could be generated as an alternative to the current Likert summative scores. Unidimensionality and reproducibility of the item scale are essential prerequisites for the development of Rasch-based person measures of physical functioning that can be used across populations and over repeated tests.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=7722580&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0895-4356(94)90215-1
dc.subject*Activities of Daily Living
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectChronic Disease
dc.subject*Health Status Indicators
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titleEvaluation of the MOS SF-36 physical functioning scale (PF-10): I. Unidimensionality and reproducibility of the Rasch item scale
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of clinical epidemiology
dc.source.volume47
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/513
dc.identifier.contextkey1363347
html.description.abstract<p>Indexes developed to measure physical functioning as an essential component of general health status are often based on sets of hierarchically-structured items intended to represent a broad underlying concept. Rasch Item Response Theory (IRT) provides a methodology to examine the hierarchical structure, unidimensionality, and reproducibility of item positions (calibrations) along a scale. Data gathered on the 10-item Physical Functioning Scale (PF-10) from a large sample of Medical Outcomes Study patients (N = 3445) were used to examine the hierarchical order, unidimensionality, and reproducibility of item calibrations. Rasch-IRT analyses generated an empirical item hierarchy, confirmed the unidimensionality of the PF-10 for most patients, and established the reproducibility of item calibrations across patient populations and repeated tests. These findings support the content validity of the PF-10 as a measure of physical functioning and suggest that valid Rasch-IRT summary scores could be generated as an alternative to the current Likert summative scores. Unidimensionality and reproducibility of the item scale are essential prerequisites for the development of Rasch-based person measures of physical functioning that can be used across populations and over repeated tests.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/513
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages671-84


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