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dc.contributor.authorMustillo, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorKrieger, Nancy
dc.contributor.authorGunderson, Erica P.
dc.contributor.authorSidney, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorMcCreath, Heather
dc.contributor.authorKiefe, Catarina I.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:41.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:16:54Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:16:54Z
dc.date.issued2004-12-01
dc.date.submitted2010-04-27
dc.identifier.citationAm J Public Health. 2004 Dec;94(12):2125-31.
dc.identifier.issn0090-0036 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid15569964
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47504
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: We examined the effects of self-reported experiences of racial discrimination on Black-White differences in preterm (less than 37 weeks gestation) and low-birthweight (less than 2500 g) deliveries. METHODS: Using logistic regression models, we analyzed data on 352 births among women enrolled in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study. RESULTS: Among Black women, 50% of those with preterm deliveries and 61% of those with low-birthweight infants reported having experienced racial discrimination in at least 3 situations; among White women, the corresponding percentages were 5% and 0%. The unadjusted odds ratio for preterm delivery among Black versus White women was 2.54 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.33, 4.85), but this value decreased to 1.88 (95% CI=0.85, 4.12) after adjustment for experiences of racial discrimination and to 1.11 (95% CI=0.51, 2.41) after additional adjustment for alcohol and tobacco use, depression, education, and income. The corresponding odds ratios for low birthweight were 4.24 (95% CI=1.31, 13.67), 2.11 (95% CI=0.75, 5.93), and 2.43 (95% CI=0.79, 7.42). CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported experiences of racial discrimination were associated with preterm and low-birthweight deliveries, and such experiences may contribute to Black-White disparities in perinatal outcomes.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=15569964&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://ajph.aphapublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/94/12/2125
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subject*African Americans
dc.subject*European Continental Ancestry Group
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subject*Infant, Low Birth Weight
dc.subjectInfant, Newborn
dc.subjectObstetric Labor, Premature
dc.subjectPregnancy
dc.subject*Prejudice
dc.subjectBioinformatics
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titleSelf-reported experiences of racial discrimination and Black-White differences in preterm and low-birthweight deliveries: the CARDIA Study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAmerican journal of public health
dc.source.volume94
dc.source.issue12
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/64
dc.identifier.contextkey1287809
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVES: We examined the effects of self-reported experiences of racial discrimination on Black-White differences in preterm (less than 37 weeks gestation) and low-birthweight (less than 2500 g) deliveries.</p> <p>METHODS: Using logistic regression models, we analyzed data on 352 births among women enrolled in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.</p> <p>RESULTS: Among Black women, 50% of those with preterm deliveries and 61% of those with low-birthweight infants reported having experienced racial discrimination in at least 3 situations; among White women, the corresponding percentages were 5% and 0%. The unadjusted odds ratio for preterm delivery among Black versus White women was 2.54 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.33, 4.85), but this value decreased to 1.88 (95% CI=0.85, 4.12) after adjustment for experiences of racial discrimination and to 1.11 (95% CI=0.51, 2.41) after additional adjustment for alcohol and tobacco use, depression, education, and income. The corresponding odds ratios for low birthweight were 4.24 (95% CI=1.31, 13.67), 2.11 (95% CI=0.75, 5.93), and 2.43 (95% CI=0.79, 7.42).</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported experiences of racial discrimination were associated with preterm and low-birthweight deliveries, and such experiences may contribute to Black-White disparities in perinatal outcomes.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/64
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages2125-31


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