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dc.contributor.authorFrayne, Susan M.
dc.contributor.authorFreund, Karen M.
dc.contributor.authorSkinner, Katherine M.
dc.contributor.authorAsh, Arlene S.
dc.contributor.authorMoskowitz, Mark A.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:42.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:17:16Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:17:16Z
dc.date.issued2004-02-24
dc.date.submitted2010-07-01
dc.identifier.citationAm J Med Qual. 2004 Jan-Feb;19(1):28-36. <a href="http://ajm.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/19/1/28">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1062-8606 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid14977023
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47591
dc.description.abstractMedical providers often fail to treat depression. We examined whether treatment is more aggressive in a setting with accessible mental health resources, the Veterans Health Administration (VA). VA and non-VA primary care physicians and medical specialists viewed a videotape vignette portraying a patient meeting criteria for major depression and then answered interviewer-administered questions about management. We found that 24% of VA versus 15% of non-VA physicians would initiate guideline-recommended treatment (antidepressants or mental health referral, or both) (P = .09). Among those who identified depression as likely, 42% of VA versus 19% of non-VA physicians would treat (P = .002): 23% versus 3% recommended mental health referral (P < .001) and 21% versus 17% an antidepressant (P = .67). Although many patients with major depression may not receive guideline-recommended management, VA physicians do initiate mental health referral more often than do non-VA physicians. Access to mental health services may prove valuable in the campaign to increase physician adherence to depression clinical guidelines.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=14977023&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://ajm.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/19/1/28
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subject*Ambulatory Care Facilities
dc.subjectDepression
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subject*Health Care Sector
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectNew England
dc.subjectPhysician's Practice Patterns
dc.subjectPrimary Health Care
dc.subject*Quality Assurance, Health Care
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectUnited States Department of Veterans Affairs
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titleDepression management in medical clinics: does healthcare sector make a difference
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAmerican journal of medical quality : the official journal of the American College of Medical Quality
dc.source.volume19
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/720
dc.identifier.contextkey1378867
html.description.abstract<p>Medical providers often fail to treat depression. We examined whether treatment is more aggressive in a setting with accessible mental health resources, the Veterans Health Administration (VA). VA and non-VA primary care physicians and medical specialists viewed a videotape vignette portraying a patient meeting criteria for major depression and then answered interviewer-administered questions about management. We found that 24% of VA versus 15% of non-VA physicians would initiate guideline-recommended treatment (antidepressants or mental health referral, or both) (P = .09). Among those who identified depression as likely, 42% of VA versus 19% of non-VA physicians would treat (P = .002): 23% versus 3% recommended mental health referral (P < .001) and 21% versus 17% an antidepressant (P = .67). Although many patients with major depression may not receive guideline-recommended management, VA physicians do initiate mental health referral more often than do non-VA physicians. Access to mental health services may prove valuable in the campaign to increase physician adherence to depression clinical guidelines.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/720
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages28-36


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