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dc.contributor.authorSaczynski, Jane S.
dc.contributor.authorPfeifer, Lisa A.
dc.contributor.authorMasaki, Kamal H.
dc.contributor.authorKorf, Esther S.
dc.contributor.authorLaurin, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Lon
dc.contributor.authorLauner, Lenore J.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:43.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:17:31Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:17:31Z
dc.date.issued2006-01-18
dc.date.submitted2010-07-21
dc.identifier.citationAm J Epidemiol. 2006 Mar 1;163(5):433-40. Epub 2006 Jan 12. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwj061">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwj061
dc.identifier.pmid16410348
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47647
dc.description.abstractThe authors examined whether low levels of social engagement in midlife and late life were associated with the risk of incident dementia in 2,513 Japanese-American men who have been followed since 1965 as part of the Honolulu Heart Program and the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study. In 1991, assessment of dementia began; incident dementia cases (n = 222) were diagnosed in 1994 and 1997. Social engagement was assessed in midlife (1968) and late life (1991). The relation between social engagement and dementia risk was examined using Cox proportional hazards models. No level of midlife social engagement was associated with the risk of dementia. In late life, compared with participants in the highest quartile of late-life social engagement, those in the lowest quartile had a significantly increased risk of dementia (hazard ratio = 2.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.18, 4.65). However, compared with those who were in the highest quartile of social engagement at both midlife and late life, only decreased social engagement from midlife to late life was associated with an increased risk of dementia (hazard ratio = 1.87, 95% confidence interval: 1.12, 3.13). Although low social engagement in late life is associated with risk of dementia, levels of late-life social engagement may already have been modified by the dementing process and may be associated with prodromal dementia.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=16410348&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwj061
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAging
dc.subjectAsian Americans
dc.subjectConfidence Intervals
dc.subjectDementia
dc.subjectFamily
dc.subjectFollow-Up Studies
dc.subjectHawaii
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectIncidence
dc.subject*Interpersonal Relations
dc.subjectJapan
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectRetrospective Studies
dc.subjectRisk Factors
dc.subject*Social Behavior
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectGeriatrics
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.titleThe effect of social engagement on incident dementia: the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAmerican journal of epidemiology
dc.source.volume163
dc.source.issue5
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/773
dc.identifier.contextkey1402778
html.description.abstract<p>The authors examined whether low levels of social engagement in midlife and late life were associated with the risk of incident dementia in 2,513 Japanese-American men who have been followed since 1965 as part of the Honolulu Heart Program and the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study. In 1991, assessment of dementia began; incident dementia cases (n = 222) were diagnosed in 1994 and 1997. Social engagement was assessed in midlife (1968) and late life (1991). The relation between social engagement and dementia risk was examined using Cox proportional hazards models. No level of midlife social engagement was associated with the risk of dementia. In late life, compared with participants in the highest quartile of late-life social engagement, those in the lowest quartile had a significantly increased risk of dementia (hazard ratio = 2.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.18, 4.65). However, compared with those who were in the highest quartile of social engagement at both midlife and late life, only decreased social engagement from midlife to late life was associated with an increased risk of dementia (hazard ratio = 1.87, 95% confidence interval: 1.12, 3.13). Although low social engagement in late life is associated with risk of dementia, levels of late-life social engagement may already have been modified by the dementing process and may be associated with prodromal dementia.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/773
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine
dc.source.pages433-40


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