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dc.contributor.authorLevine, Deborah A.
dc.contributor.authorAllison, Jeroan J.
dc.contributor.authorCherrington, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorRichman, Joshua S.
dc.contributor.authorScarinci, Isabel C.
dc.contributor.authorHouston, Thomas K.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:43.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:17:48Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:17:48Z
dc.date.issued2009-06-20
dc.date.submitted2010-08-05
dc.identifier.citationEthn Dis. 2009 Spring;19(2):97-103.
dc.identifier.issn1049-510X (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid19537217
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/47712
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: In adults with insulin-treated diabetes, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) rates may be lower in minority or low-income populations, but the effect of income on racial/ethnic differences in SMBG is unknown. METHODS: We assessed whether racial/ethnic differences in SMBG vary by income among adults with insulin-treated diabetes by using Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from 2000 through 2004. We measured the prevalence of SMBG at least once per day among 16,630 adults aged > or = 19 years with insulin-treated diabetes. RESULTS: At incomes > or = $20,000, Hispanics and non-Hispanic Blacks reported similar but lower SMBG rates than did non-Hispanic Whites (78%, 77%, 85%; P < or = .01). However, among those with income < $20,000, Hispanics performed SMBG substantially less than did Blacks or Whites (65%, 79%, 85%; P < or = .01). Racial/ ethnic differences in SMBC persisted after adjustment for age, sex, education, health insurance, health status, survey period, and diabetes measures. Receipt of diabetes education varied significantly by race/ethnicity in the income < $20,000 group only (Hispanics 49%, Blacks 64%, Whites 62%; P < .001). Low-income Hispanics with limited English proficiency had lower SMBG and diabetes education rates than did those with English proficiency (61% vs 79% and 44% vs 58%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Among US adults with insulin-treated diabetes, Hispanics and Blacks performed daily SMBG less frequently than did Whites. Stratification by income revealed a disparity gradient in the income < $20,000 group: SMBG rates decreased from Whites to Blacks to Hispanics. Low-income Hispanics with limited English proficiency are at greater risk for reduced SMBG than are those proficient in English.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=19537217&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ishib.org/journal/19-2/ethn-19-02-97.pdf
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAfrican Americans
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
dc.subjectBlood Glucose Self-Monitoring
dc.subjectEuropean Continental Ancestry Group
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHealthcare Disparities
dc.subjectHispanic Americans
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectIncome
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectMinority Groups
dc.subjectPoverty
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.subjectBioinformatics
dc.subjectBiostatistics
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titleDisparities in self-monitoring of blood glucose among low-income ethnic minority populations with diabetes, United States
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleEthnicity and disease
dc.source.volume19
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/835
dc.identifier.contextkey1426309
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: In adults with insulin-treated diabetes, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) rates may be lower in minority or low-income populations, but the effect of income on racial/ethnic differences in SMBG is unknown.</p> <p>METHODS: We assessed whether racial/ethnic differences in SMBG vary by income among adults with insulin-treated diabetes by using Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from 2000 through 2004. We measured the prevalence of SMBG at least once per day among 16,630 adults aged > or = 19 years with insulin-treated diabetes.</p> <p>RESULTS: At incomes > or = $20,000, Hispanics and non-Hispanic Blacks reported similar but lower SMBG rates than did non-Hispanic Whites (78%, 77%, 85%; P < or = .01). However, among those with income < $20,000, Hispanics performed SMBG substantially less than did Blacks or Whites (65%, 79%, 85%; P < or = .01). Racial/ ethnic differences in SMBC persisted after adjustment for age, sex, education, health insurance, health status, survey period, and diabetes measures. Receipt of diabetes education varied significantly by race/ethnicity in the income < $20,000 group only (Hispanics 49%, Blacks 64%, Whites 62%; P < .001). Low-income Hispanics with limited English proficiency had lower SMBG and diabetes education rates than did those with English proficiency (61% vs 79% and 44% vs 58%, respectively).</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Among US adults with insulin-treated diabetes, Hispanics and Blacks performed daily SMBG less frequently than did Whites. Stratification by income revealed a disparity gradient in the income < $20,000 group: SMBG rates decreased from Whites to Blacks to Hispanics. Low-income Hispanics with limited English proficiency are at greater risk for reduced SMBG than are those proficient in English.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathqhs_pp/835
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages97-103


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