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dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Natalie
dc.contributor.authorAkalin, Ali
dc.contributor.authorSirkis, Hartley M.
dc.contributor.authorMost, Mathew J.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:46.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:19:40Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:19:40Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-01
dc.date.submitted2017-05-15
dc.identifier.citation<p>Am J Orthop (Belle Mead NJ). 2015 Dec;44(12):563-8.</p>
dc.identifier.issn1078-4519 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid26665244
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/48128
dc.description.abstractEosinophilic granuloma (EG) is the most common and benign form of the spectrum of disorders referred to as Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Langerhans cell histiocytosis is primarily regarded as a pediatric disease, with few adult cases of multifocal EG of bone reported. We report a case of multifocal EG in a 48-year-old woman, who presented with right knee pain. Radiographs showed a small lytic lesion in the medial femoral condyle. Diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasound-guided biopsy. She had had a previous EG lesion excised from her skull. Whole-body bone scan demonstrated a new skull lesion in the right diploic space, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent curettage, bone grafting, and prophylactic internal fixation of the right distal femur lesion. The skull lesion was treated with repeat craniectomy. Two years later, she developed a new lesion in the right distal femoral metaphysis, which was treated with intralesional corticosteroid injections. Now, more than 1 year later, the patient is pain-free with no evidence of new or recurrent disease. Because multifocal EG is a rare diagnosis in adults, appropriate clinical suspicion, in combination with radiographic findings and histologic examination, is essential for correct diagnosis and treatment.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=26665244&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdedge.com/amjorthopedics/article/104887/knee/multifocal-langerhans-cell-histiocytosis-adult
dc.subjectHemic and Lymphatic Diseases
dc.subjectPathology
dc.subjectRadiology
dc.titleMultifocal Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAmerican journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
dc.source.volume44
dc.source.issue12
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1244&amp;context=radiology_pubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/radiology_pubs/235
dc.identifier.contextkey10166382
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T17:19:40Z
html.description.abstract<p>Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) is the most common and benign form of the spectrum of disorders referred to as Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Langerhans cell histiocytosis is primarily regarded as a pediatric disease, with few adult cases of multifocal EG of bone reported. We report a case of multifocal EG in a 48-year-old woman, who presented with right knee pain. Radiographs showed a small lytic lesion in the medial femoral condyle. Diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasound-guided biopsy. She had had a previous EG lesion excised from her skull. Whole-body bone scan demonstrated a new skull lesion in the right diploic space, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent curettage, bone grafting, and prophylactic internal fixation of the right distal femur lesion. The skull lesion was treated with repeat craniectomy. Two years later, she developed a new lesion in the right distal femoral metaphysis, which was treated with intralesional corticosteroid injections. Now, more than 1 year later, the patient is pain-free with no evidence of new or recurrent disease. Because multifocal EG is a rare diagnosis in adults, appropriate clinical suspicion, in combination with radiographic findings and histologic examination, is essential for correct diagnosis and treatment.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathradiology_pubs/235
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Orthopedics and Physical Rehabilitation
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pathology
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology
dc.source.pages563-8


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