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dc.contributor.authorBomprezzi, Roberto
dc.contributor.authorChen, Andrew P.
dc.contributor.authorHemond, Christopher C.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:49.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:21:11Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:21:11Z
dc.date.issued2020-12-01
dc.date.submitted2020-12-14
dc.identifier.citation<p>Bomprezzi R, Chen AP, Hemond CC. Cervical spondylosis is a risk factor for localized spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis. Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2020 Dec;199:106311. doi: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2020.106311. Epub 2020 Oct 15. PMID: 33091657. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clineuro.2020.106311">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn0303-8467 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clineuro.2020.106311
dc.identifier.pmid33091657
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/48466
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To answer the question whether cervical spondylosis would increase the incidence of cord lesions in MS patients, we investigated the statistical association between the two pathologies. METHODS: We extracted demographics, basic disease characteristics and MRI data of a cohort of 304 consecutive MS patients. For a subset of 176 patients, a detailed analysis independently assessed for each cervical level the co-existence of spinal canal narrowing from spondylosis and corresponding cord signal abnormalities. RESULTS: The cohort had typical demographics and in over 80 % of cases there was at least one cord lesion. EDSS correlated with age, disease duration, cerebral lesion burden and spinal cord lesions. After adjusting for either age, disease duration, central lesion burden, or EDSS, the presence of spinal spondylosis was not significantly associated with spinal cord lesions (p > 0.05). In the subset of 176 subjects with the level-by-level spine data, we found a highly statistically significant association (Pearson's chi(2) = 23.7, p < 0.001) between canal narrowing and cord lesion at the level directly above or below. This association remained highly significant in both univariable and multivariable logistic regression models adjusting for age, disease duration, MS treatment, cerebral lesion burden and disability scores (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The data from our cohort of MS patients suggest an indirect contribution of cervical spondylosis to disability by increasing the risk of developing localized cord lesions. While further studies are needed to confirm the findings and clarify disease mechanisms, closer attention should be paid to worsening spondylosis in patients with MS.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=33091657&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.clineuro.2020.106311
dc.subjectCervical spinal cord
dc.subjectCervical spondylosis
dc.subjectDemyelinating lesions
dc.subjectMultiple sclerosis
dc.subjectNeuroinflammation
dc.subjectMusculoskeletal Diseases
dc.subjectNervous System Diseases
dc.subjectNeurology
dc.subjectNeurosurgery
dc.subjectPathological Conditions, Signs and Symptoms
dc.subjectRadiology
dc.titleCervical spondylosis is a risk factor for localized spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleClinical neurology and neurosurgery
dc.source.volume199
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/radiology_pubs/570
dc.identifier.contextkey20590156
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVES: To answer the question whether cervical spondylosis would increase the incidence of cord lesions in MS patients, we investigated the statistical association between the two pathologies.</p> <p>METHODS: We extracted demographics, basic disease characteristics and MRI data of a cohort of 304 consecutive MS patients. For a subset of 176 patients, a detailed analysis independently assessed for each cervical level the co-existence of spinal canal narrowing from spondylosis and corresponding cord signal abnormalities.</p> <p>RESULTS: The cohort had typical demographics and in over 80 % of cases there was at least one cord lesion. EDSS correlated with age, disease duration, cerebral lesion burden and spinal cord lesions. After adjusting for either age, disease duration, central lesion burden, or EDSS, the presence of spinal spondylosis was not significantly associated with spinal cord lesions (p > 0.05). In the subset of 176 subjects with the level-by-level spine data, we found a highly statistically significant association (Pearson's chi(2) = 23.7, p < 0.001) between canal narrowing and cord lesion at the level directly above or below. This association remained highly significant in both univariable and multivariable logistic regression models adjusting for age, disease duration, MS treatment, cerebral lesion burden and disability scores (p < 0.001).</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: The data from our cohort of MS patients suggest an indirect contribution of cervical spondylosis to disability by increasing the risk of developing localized cord lesions. While further studies are needed to confirm the findings and clarify disease mechanisms, closer attention should be paid to worsening spondylosis in patients with MS.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathradiology_pubs/570
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neurology
dc.source.pages106311


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