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dc.contributor.authorJin, Mingwu
dc.contributor.authorYang, Yongyi
dc.contributor.authorNiu, Xiaofeng
dc.contributor.authorMarin, Thibault
dc.contributor.authorBrankov, Jovan G.
dc.contributor.authorFeng, Bing
dc.contributor.authorPretorius, P. Hendrik
dc.contributor.authorKing, Michael A.
dc.contributor.authorWernick, Miles N.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:50.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:21:44Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:21:44Z
dc.date.issued2009-09-21
dc.date.submitted2014-10-10
dc.identifier.citationPhys Med Biol. 2009 Sep 21;54(18):5643-59. doi: 10.1088/0031-9155/54/18/019.. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/54/18/019">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0031-9155 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/0031-9155/54/18/019.
dc.identifier.pmid19724094
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/48592
dc.description.abstractIn practice, gated cardiac SPECT images suffer from a number of degrading factors, including distance-dependent blur, attenuation, scatter and increased noise due to gating. Recently, we proposed a motion-compensated approach for four-dimensional (4D) reconstruction for gated cardiac SPECT and demonstrated that use of motion-compensated temporal smoothing could be effective for suppressing the increased noise due to lowered counts in individual gates. In this work, we further develop this motion-compensated 4D approach by also taking into account attenuation and scatter in the reconstruction process, which are two major degrading factors in SPECT data. In our experiments, we conducted a thorough quantitative evaluation of the proposed 4D method using Monte Carlo simulated SPECT imaging based on the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom. In particular, we evaluated the accuracy of the reconstructed left ventricular myocardium using a number of quantitative measures including regional bias-variance analyses and wall intensity uniformity. The quantitative results demonstrate that use of motion-compensated 4D reconstruction can improve the accuracy of the reconstructed myocardium, which in turn can improve the detectability of perfusion defects. Moreover, our results reveal that while traditional spatial smoothing could be beneficial, its merit would become diminished with the use of motion-compensated temporal regularization. As a preliminary demonstration, we also tested our 4D approach on patient data. The reconstructed images from both simulated and patient data demonstrated that our 4D method can improve the definition of the LV wall.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=19724094&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/54/18/019
dc.subject*Algorithms
dc.subjectCardiac-Gated Single-Photon Emission Computer-Assisted
dc.subjectTomography
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectImage Enhancement
dc.subjectImage Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
dc.subjectImaging, Three-Dimensional
dc.subjectPhantoms, Imaging
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectSensitivity and Specificity
dc.subjectRadiology
dc.titleA quantitative evaluation study of four-dimensional gated cardiac SPECT reconstruction
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitlePhysics in medicine and biology
dc.source.volume54
dc.source.issue18
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/radiology_pubs/8
dc.identifier.contextkey6227709
html.description.abstract<p>In practice, gated cardiac SPECT images suffer from a number of degrading factors, including distance-dependent blur, attenuation, scatter and increased noise due to gating. Recently, we proposed a motion-compensated approach for four-dimensional (4D) reconstruction for gated cardiac SPECT and demonstrated that use of motion-compensated temporal smoothing could be effective for suppressing the increased noise due to lowered counts in individual gates. In this work, we further develop this motion-compensated 4D approach by also taking into account attenuation and scatter in the reconstruction process, which are two major degrading factors in SPECT data. In our experiments, we conducted a thorough quantitative evaluation of the proposed 4D method using Monte Carlo simulated SPECT imaging based on the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom. In particular, we evaluated the accuracy of the reconstructed left ventricular myocardium using a number of quantitative measures including regional bias-variance analyses and wall intensity uniformity. The quantitative results demonstrate that use of motion-compensated 4D reconstruction can improve the accuracy of the reconstructed myocardium, which in turn can improve the detectability of perfusion defects. Moreover, our results reveal that while traditional spatial smoothing could be beneficial, its merit would become diminished with the use of motion-compensated temporal regularization. As a preliminary demonstration, we also tested our 4D approach on patient data. The reconstructed images from both simulated and patient data demonstrated that our 4D method can improve the definition of the LV wall.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathradiology_pubs/8
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology
dc.source.pages5643-59


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