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dc.contributor.authorHale, Janet Fraser
dc.contributor.authorCahan, Mitchell
dc.contributor.authorZanetti, Mary L.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:51.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:22:08Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:22:08Z
dc.date.issued2011-07-11
dc.date.submitted2011-08-02
dc.identifier.citationTeach Learn Med. 2011 Jul-Sep;23(3):278-84. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10401334.2011.586934">Link to article on publisher's website</a>
dc.identifier.issn1532-8015
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10401334.2011.586934
dc.identifier.pmid21745064
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/48680
dc.description.abstractBackground: A 2004 survey reveals that the implementation of the 1998 AAMC report on medical student clinical skills training is slow. Given the importance of intravenous catheter placement, a creative approach evolved to educate medical students on this important skill. Description: As part of a community service learning initiative, six graduate nursing students developed, implemented, and evaluated a pilot IV Cannulation Education Module taught to medical students. Evaluation: Data analysis of 63 participants reveals improved knowledge and confidence in medical students' ability to place an intravenous catheter. The objectives were met and the process enjoyed by students of both professions. Conclusion: Opportunities for interprofessional teaching and learning include clinical skills training. Medical students learned an important skill taught by graduate nursing students who developed and evaluated a curriculum that met their own graduate course objectives. Both professions appreciated the opportunity to work collaboratively to achieve their respective programmatic goals.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=21745064&dopt=Abstract">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10401334.2011.586934
dc.subjectEducation, Nursing, Graduate
dc.subjectEducation, Medical, Undergraduate
dc.subjectClinical Competence
dc.subjectEducational Assessment, Evaluation, and Research
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.titleIntegration of basic clinical skills training in medical education: an interprofessional simulated teaching experience
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleTeaching and learning in medicine
dc.source.volume23
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/res_eval/31
dc.identifier.contextkey2127193
html.description.abstract<p>Background: A 2004 survey reveals that the implementation of the 1998 AAMC report on medical student clinical skills training is slow. Given the importance of intravenous catheter placement, a creative approach evolved to educate medical students on this important skill.</p> <p>Description: As part of a community service learning initiative, six graduate nursing students developed, implemented, and evaluated a pilot IV Cannulation Education Module taught to medical students.</p> <p>Evaluation: Data analysis of 63 participants reveals improved knowledge and confidence in medical students' ability to place an intravenous catheter. The objectives were met and the process enjoyed by students of both professions.</p> <p>Conclusion: Opportunities for interprofessional teaching and learning include clinical skills training. Medical students learned an important skill taught by graduate nursing students who developed and evaluated a curriculum that met their own graduate course objectives. Both professions appreciated the opportunity to work collaboratively to achieve their respective programmatic goals.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathres_eval/31
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Research and Evaluation
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Nursing
dc.source.pages278-84


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