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dc.contributor.authorFolta, Sara C.
dc.contributor.authorCurtin, Carol
dc.contributor.authorMust, Aviva
dc.contributor.authorPehrson, Annie
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Katelyn
dc.contributor.authorBandini, Linda G.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:53.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:23:39Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:23:39Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-01
dc.date.submitted2020-11-13
dc.identifier.citation<p>Folta SC, Curtin C, Must A, Pehrson A, Ryan K, Bandini L. Impact of Selective Eating on Social Domains Among Transition-Age Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Qualitative Study. J Autism Dev Disord. 2020 Aug;50(8):2902-2912. doi: 10.1007/s10803-020-04397-4. PMID: 32034651. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-020-04397-4">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn0162-3257 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10803-020-04397-4
dc.identifier.pmid32034651
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/49009
dc.description.abstractFood selectivity is a common feeding problem among autistic children. The objective of this qualitative study was to explore the impact of selective eating on key social domains-with family, peers, and in other social situations-of transition-age autistic youth who self-identified as being food selective. Interviews were conducted with 20 autistic youth ages 18-23 years. Data were analyzed using descriptive and thematic coding. Participants had developed a range of strategies to cope with their food selectivity, and although some expressed concerns, they did not feel that it had a major impact on social situations. A responsive approach to supporting such youth would likely involve recognizing the effort and skills that the youth have already developed around this issue.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=32034651&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-020-04397-4
dc.subjectAutism spectrum disorder
dc.subjectFood selectivity
dc.subjectSocial domain
dc.subjectTransition-age youth
dc.subjectDietetics and Clinical Nutrition
dc.subjectDisability Studies
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.titleImpact of Selective Eating on Social Domains Among Transition-Age Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Qualitative Study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of autism and developmental disorders
dc.source.volume50
dc.source.issue8
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/shriver_pp/83
dc.identifier.contextkey20180748
html.description.abstract<p>Food selectivity is a common feeding problem among autistic children. The objective of this qualitative study was to explore the impact of selective eating on key social domains-with family, peers, and in other social situations-of transition-age autistic youth who self-identified as being food selective. Interviews were conducted with 20 autistic youth ages 18-23 years. Data were analyzed using descriptive and thematic coding. Participants had developed a range of strategies to cope with their food selectivity, and although some expressed concerns, they did not feel that it had a major impact on social situations. A responsive approach to supporting such youth would likely involve recognizing the effort and skills that the youth have already developed around this issue.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathshriver_pp/83
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicine and Community Health
dc.contributor.departmentEunice Kennedy Shriver Center
dc.source.pages2902-2912


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