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dc.contributor.authorBurdick, Kendall J.
dc.contributor.authorCallahan, Christine J.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:54.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:23:59Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:23:59Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-01
dc.date.submitted2021-01-13
dc.identifier.citation<p>Burdick KJ, Callahan CJ. Sleeping Soundlessly in the Intensive Care Unit. <em>Multimodal Technologies and Interaction</em>. 2020; 4(1):6. <a href="https://doi.org/10.3390/mti4010006" target="_blank" title="view article on publisher site">https://doi.org/10.3390/mti4010006</a></p>
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/mti4010006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/49095
dc.description.abstractAn estimated 70% of patients who have been in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) experience some form of Post-Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS). As a stressful environment, the ICU can be traumatic for any patient; however, the disruption of sleep experienced by patients in ICU negatively impacts their mental status and recovery. One of the most significant contributors to sleep disruption is the constant blare of monitor alarms, many of which are false or redundant. Through multisensory approaches and procedural redesign, the hostile acoustic environment of the ICU that causes so many to suffer from PICS may be alleviated. In this paper, we present suggestions for improving the ICU acoustic environment to possibly reduce the incidence of post-ICU complications such as PICS.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rights© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectpost-intensive care syndrome
dc.subjectpost-traumatic stress disorder
dc.subjectmultisensory alarm
dc.subjectmultimodal design
dc.subjectproactive care
dc.subjectintensive care unit
dc.subjectCritical Care
dc.subjectMedical Education
dc.subjectQuality Improvement
dc.titleSleeping Soundlessly in the Intensive Care Unit
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleMultimodal Technologies and Interaction
dc.source.volume4
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1011&amp;context=som_pubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/som_pubs/11
dc.identifier.contextkey21069040
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T17:23:59Z
html.description.abstract<p>An estimated 70% of patients who have been in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) experience some form of Post-Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS). As a stressful environment, the ICU can be traumatic for any patient; however, the disruption of sleep experienced by patients in ICU negatively impacts their mental status and recovery. One of the most significant contributors to sleep disruption is the constant blare of monitor alarms, many of which are false or redundant. Through multisensory approaches and procedural redesign, the hostile acoustic environment of the ICU that causes so many to suffer from PICS may be alleviated. In this paper, we present suggestions for improving the ICU acoustic environment to possibly reduce the incidence of post-ICU complications such as PICS.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathsom_pubs/11
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Medicine
dc.source.pages6
dc.contributor.studentKendall J. Burdick; Christine J. Callahan


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© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).