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dc.contributor.advisorStephen J. Heller
dc.contributor.authorLambou-Gianoukos, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorHeller, Stephen J.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:55.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:24:46Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:24:46Z
dc.date.issued2008-12-01
dc.date.submitted2016-03-25
dc.identifier.citationLambou-Gianoukos S, Heller SJ. Lithogenesis and bile metabolism. Surg Clin North Am. 2008 Dec;88(6):1175-94, vii. doi: 10.1016/j.suc.2008.07.009. Review. PubMed PMID: 18992590.
dc.identifier.issn0039-6109
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.suc.2008.07.009
dc.identifier.pmid18992590
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/49260
dc.description<p>Stephanie Lambou-Gianoukos participated in this study as a medical student as part of the Senior Scholars research program at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.</p>
dc.description.abstractGallstone disease exacts a considerable financial and social burden worldwide leading to frequent physician visits and hospitalizations. Based on their composition, gallstones are categorized as cholesterol, black pigment, and brown pigment, with each category having a unique structural, epidemiologic, and risk factor profile. Cholesterol crystal formation requires the presence of one or more of the following: (a) cholesterol supersaturation, (b) accelerated nucleation, or (c) gallbladder hypomotility/bile stasis. Some risk factors for cholesterol stones include age, gender, genetics, obesity, rapid weight loss, and ileal disease. Generally, pigment stones are formed by the precipitation of bilirubin in bile, with black stones associated with chronic hemolytic states, cirrhosis, Gilbert syndrome, or cystic fibrosis, and brown stones associated with chronic bacterial or parasitic infections.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=18992590&dopt=Abstract">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.suc.2008.07.009
dc.subjectBile
dc.subjectBile Acids and Salts
dc.subjectGallstones
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectRisk Factors
dc.subjectDigestive System Diseases
dc.titleLithogenesis and bile metabolism
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe Surgical clinics of North America
dc.source.volume88
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ssp/204
dc.identifier.contextkey8383175
html.description.abstract<p>Gallstone disease exacts a considerable financial and social burden worldwide leading to frequent physician visits and hospitalizations. Based on their composition, gallstones are categorized as cholesterol, black pigment, and brown pigment, with each category having a unique structural, epidemiologic, and risk factor profile. Cholesterol crystal formation requires the presence of one or more of the following: (a) cholesterol supersaturation, (b) accelerated nucleation, or (c) gallbladder hypomotility/bile stasis. Some risk factors for cholesterol stones include age, gender, genetics, obesity, rapid weight loss, and ileal disease. Generally, pigment stones are formed by the precipitation of bilirubin in bile, with black stones associated with chronic hemolytic states, cirrhosis, Gilbert syndrome, or cystic fibrosis, and brown stones associated with chronic bacterial or parasitic infections.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathssp/204
dc.contributor.departmentSenior Scholars Program
dc.source.pages1175-94


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