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dc.contributor.authorGisselbrecht, Stephen S.
dc.contributor.authorPalagi, Alexandre
dc.contributor.authorKurland, Jesse V.
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Julia M.
dc.contributor.authorOzadam, Hakan
dc.contributor.authorZhan, Ye
dc.contributor.authorDekker, Job
dc.contributor.authorBulyk, Martha L.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:59.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:27:34Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:27:34Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-16
dc.date.submitted2020-01-28
dc.identifier.citation<p>Mol Cell. 2020 Jan 16;77(2):324-337.e8. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel.2019.10.004. Epub 2019 Nov 5. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2019.10.004">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1097-2765 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.molcel.2019.10.004
dc.identifier.pmid31704182
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/49892
dc.description.abstractA major challenge in biology is to understand how complex gene expression patterns are encoded in the genome. While transcriptional enhancers have been studied extensively, few transcriptional silencers have been identified, and they remain poorly understood. Here, we used a novel strategy to screen hundreds of sequences for tissue-specific silencer activity in whole Drosophila embryos. Almost all of the transcriptional silencers that we identified were also active enhancers in other cellular contexts. These elements are bound by more transcription factors than non-silencers. A subset of these silencers forms long-range contacts with promoters. Deletion of a silencer caused derepression of its target gene. Our results challenge the common practice of treating enhancers and silencers as separate classes of regulatory elements and suggest the possibility that thousands or more bifunctional CRMs remain to be discovered in Drosophila and 10(4)-10(5) in humans.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=31704182&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2019.10.004
dc.subjectenhancers
dc.subjectsilencers
dc.subjectcis-regulatory elements
dc.subjecttranscriptional regulation
dc.subjectrepression
dc.subjectpromoter looping
dc.subjectBioinformatics
dc.subjectCell and Developmental Biology
dc.subjectGenetics and Genomics
dc.subjectSystems Biology
dc.titleTranscriptional Silencers in Drosophila Serve a Dual Role as Transcriptional Enhancers in Alternate Cellular Contexts
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleMolecular cell
dc.source.volume77
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/sysbio_pubs/162
dc.identifier.contextkey16359729
html.description.abstract<p>A major challenge in biology is to understand how complex gene expression patterns are encoded in the genome. While transcriptional enhancers have been studied extensively, few transcriptional silencers have been identified, and they remain poorly understood. Here, we used a novel strategy to screen hundreds of sequences for tissue-specific silencer activity in whole Drosophila embryos. Almost all of the transcriptional silencers that we identified were also active enhancers in other cellular contexts. These elements are bound by more transcription factors than non-silencers. A subset of these silencers forms long-range contacts with promoters. Deletion of a silencer caused derepression of its target gene. Our results challenge the common practice of treating enhancers and silencers as separate classes of regulatory elements and suggest the possibility that thousands or more bifunctional CRMs remain to be discovered in Drosophila and 10(4)-10(5) in humans.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathsysbio_pubs/162
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Systems Biology
dc.source.pages324-337.e8


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