Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMack, Deborah
dc.contributor.authorHunnicutt, Jacob N.
dc.contributor.authorJesdale, William M.
dc.contributor.authorLapane, Kate L.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:02.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:29:24Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:29:24Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-12
dc.date.submitted2018-06-11
dc.identifier.citation<p>J Pain Res. 2018 Apr 12;11:753-761. doi: 10.2147/JPR.S158128. eCollection 2018. <a href="https://doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S158128">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1178-7090 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/JPR.S158128
dc.identifier.pmid29695927
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50309
dc.description.abstractBackground: Racial disparities in pain management persist across health care settings and likely extend into nursing homes. No recent studies have evaluated racial disparities in pain management among residents with cancer in nursing homes at time of admission. Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, we compared reported pain and pain management between non-Hispanic White and non-Hispanic Black newly admitted nursing home residents with cancer (n=342,920) using the de-identified Minimum Data Set version 3.0. Pain management strategies included the use of scheduled analgesics, pro re nata analgesics, and non-pharmacological methods. Presence of pain was based on self-report when residents were able, and staff report when unable. Robust Poisson models provided estimates of adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) and 95% CIs for reported pain and pain management strategies. Results: Among nursing home residents with cancer, ~60% reported pain with non-Hispanic Blacks less likely to have both self-reported pain (aPR [Black versus White]: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97-0.99) and staff-reported pain (aPR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.86-0.93) documentation compared with Non-Hispanic Whites. While most residents received some pharmacologic pain management, Blacks were less likely to receive any compared with Whites (Blacks: 66.6%, Whites: 71.1%; aPR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97-0.99), consistent with differences in receipt of non-pharmacologic treatments (Blacks: 25.8%, Whites: 34.0%; aPR: 0.98, 95 CI%: 0.96-0.99). Conclusion: Less pain was reported for Black compared with White nursing home residents and White residents subsequently received more frequent pain management at admission. The extent to which unequal reporting and management of pain persists in nursing homes should be further explored.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=29695927&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rights© 2018 Mack et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms (https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php).
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
dc.subjectUMCCTS funding
dc.subjectcancer
dc.subjectnursing homes
dc.subjectpain
dc.subjectpain management
dc.subjectrace
dc.subjectGeriatrics
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectNeoplasms
dc.subjectPain Management
dc.subjectPathological Conditions, Signs and Symptoms
dc.subjectPsychological Phenomena and Processes
dc.subjectRace and Ethnicity
dc.subjectTherapeutics
dc.subjectTranslational Medical Research
dc.titleNon-Hispanic Black-White disparities in pain and pain management among newly admitted nursing home residents with cancer
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of pain research
dc.source.volume11
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1146&amp;context=umccts_pubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/umccts_pubs/137
dc.identifier.contextkey12289584
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T17:29:24Z
html.description.abstract<p>Background: Racial disparities in pain management persist across health care settings and likely extend into nursing homes. No recent studies have evaluated racial disparities in pain management among residents with cancer in nursing homes at time of admission.</p> <p>Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, we compared reported pain and pain management between non-Hispanic White and non-Hispanic Black newly admitted nursing home residents with cancer (n=342,920) using the de-identified Minimum Data Set version 3.0. Pain management strategies included the use of scheduled analgesics, pro re nata analgesics, and non-pharmacological methods. Presence of pain was based on self-report when residents were able, and staff report when unable. Robust Poisson models provided estimates of adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) and 95% CIs for reported pain and pain management strategies.</p> <p>Results: Among nursing home residents with cancer, ~60% reported pain with non-Hispanic Blacks less likely to have both self-reported pain (aPR [Black versus White]: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97-0.99) and staff-reported pain (aPR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.86-0.93) documentation compared with Non-Hispanic Whites. While most residents received some pharmacologic pain management, Blacks were less likely to receive any compared with Whites (Blacks: 66.6%, Whites: 71.1%; aPR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97-0.99), consistent with differences in receipt of non-pharmacologic treatments (Blacks: 25.8%, Whites: 34.0%; aPR: 0.98, 95 CI%: 0.96-0.99).</p> <p>Conclusion: Less pain was reported for Black compared with White nursing home residents and White residents subsequently received more frequent pain management at admission. The extent to which unequal reporting and management of pain persists in nursing homes should be further explored.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathumccts_pubs/137
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Clinical and Population Health Research Program
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages753-761


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
JPR_158128_black_white_dispari ...
Size:
228.1Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2018 Mack et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms (https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 Mack et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms (https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php).