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dc.contributor.authorSilfee, Valerie J.
dc.contributor.authorHaughton, Christina
dc.contributor.authorJake-Schoffman, Danielle E.
dc.contributor.authorLópez-Cepero, Andrea A
dc.contributor.authorMay, Christine N.
dc.contributor.authorSreedhara, Meera
dc.contributor.authorRosal, Milagros C.
dc.contributor.authorLemon, Stephenie C.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:02.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:29:26Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:29:26Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-01
dc.date.submitted2018-08-16
dc.identifier.citation<p>Prev Med Rep. 2018 Sept;11:74-80. doi: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.05.003. eCollection 2018 Sep. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.05.003">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn2211-3355 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.05.003
dc.identifier.pmid29984142
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50318
dc.description.abstractValid, reliable, and direct measures of physical activity (PA) are critical to assessing the impact of lifestyle PA interventions. However, little is known about the extent to which objective measures have been used to assess the outcomes of lifestyle PA interventions. This systematic review had two aims: 1) evaluate the extent to which PA is measured objectively in lifestyle PA interventions targeting adults and 2) explore and summarize what objective measures have been used and what PA dimensions and metrics have been reported. Pubmed, Cochrane Central Register, and PsychInfo were searched for lifestyle PA interventions conducted between 2006 and 2016. Of the 342 articles that met the inclusion criteria, 239 studies measured PA via subjective measures and 103 studies measured PA via objective measures. The proportion of studies using objective measures increased from 4.4% to 70.6% from 2006 to 2016. All studies measuring PA objectively utilized wearable devices; half (50.5%) used pedometers only and 40.8% used accelerometers only. A majority of the 103 studies reported steps (73.8%) as their PA metric. Incorporating objective measures of PA should continue to be a priority in PA research. More work is needed to address the challenges of comprehensive and consistent collecting, reporting, and analyzing of PA metrics.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=29984142&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rights© 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY-NC-ND/4.0/).
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectAccelerometry
dc.subjectInterventions
dc.subjectPedometer
dc.subjectPhysical activity
dc.subjectSystematic review/meta-analysis
dc.subjectUMCCTS funding
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectEquipment and Supplies
dc.subjectExercise Science
dc.subjectHealth Information Technology
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.subjectTranslational Medical Research
dc.titleObjective measurement of physical activity outcomes in lifestyle interventions among adults: A systematic review
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitlePreventive medicine reports
dc.source.volume11
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1155&amp;context=umccts_pubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/umccts_pubs/146
dc.identifier.contextkey12670823
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T17:29:26Z
html.description.abstract<p>Valid, reliable, and direct measures of physical activity (PA) are critical to assessing the impact of lifestyle PA interventions. However, little is known about the extent to which objective measures have been used to assess the outcomes of lifestyle PA interventions. This systematic review had two aims: 1) evaluate the extent to which PA is measured objectively in lifestyle PA interventions targeting adults and 2) explore and summarize what objective measures have been used and what PA dimensions and metrics have been reported. Pubmed, Cochrane Central Register, and PsychInfo were searched for lifestyle PA interventions conducted between 2006 and 2016. Of the 342 articles that met the inclusion criteria, 239 studies measured PA via subjective measures and 103 studies measured PA via objective measures. The proportion of studies using objective measures increased from 4.4% to 70.6% from 2006 to 2016. All studies measuring PA objectively utilized wearable devices; half (50.5%) used pedometers only and 40.8% used accelerometers only. A majority of the 103 studies reported steps (73.8%) as their PA metric. Incorporating objective measures of PA should continue to be a priority in PA research. More work is needed to address the challenges of comprehensive and consistent collecting, reporting, and analyzing of PA metrics.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathumccts_pubs/146
dc.contributor.departmentPrevention Research Center
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, Department of Medicine
dc.source.pages74-80


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© 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY-NC-ND/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY-NC-ND/4.0/).