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dc.contributor.authorBhat, Amritha
dc.contributor.authorCerimele, Joseph M.
dc.contributor.authorByatt, Nancy
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:02.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:29:27Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:29:27Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-20
dc.date.submitted2018-09-11
dc.identifier.citation<p>Psychiatr Serv. 2018 Aug 20:appips201800133. doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.201800133. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201800133">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1075-2730 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1176/appi.ps.201800133
dc.identifier.pmid30122137
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50319
dc.description.abstractUp to 20% of women who screen positive for depression in the perinatal period in primary care and obstetric settings may have bipolar disorder, but little is known about best practices for this population. This column describes clinical programs that support identification and management of depression and bipolar disorder among women in non-mental health settings. The programs use diverse management strategies, including referral to specialty mental health, collaborative care, and consultation and care coordination. Most mental health programs based in primary care and obstetric settings are designed for depression treatment. Assessment and treatment strategies need to be refined to ensure that women with bipolar disorder receive appropriate care.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=30122137&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201800133
dc.subjectUMCCTS funding
dc.subjectBipolar Disorder
dc.subjectPerinatal
dc.subjectPregnancy and mental illness
dc.subjectPrimary care
dc.subjectWomen
dc.subjectFemale Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy Complications
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.subjectTranslational Medical Research
dc.subjectWomen's Health
dc.titlePregnant and Postpartum Women With Bipolar Disorder: Taking the Care to Where They Are
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitlePsychiatric services (Washington, D.C.)
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/umccts_pubs/147
dc.identifier.contextkey12824246
html.description.abstract<p>Up to 20% of women who screen positive for depression in the perinatal period in primary care and obstetric settings may have bipolar disorder, but little is known about best practices for this population. This column describes clinical programs that support identification and management of depression and bipolar disorder among women in non-mental health settings. The programs use diverse management strategies, including referral to specialty mental health, collaborative care, and consultation and care coordination. Most mental health programs based in primary care and obstetric settings are designed for depression treatment. Assessment and treatment strategies need to be refined to ensure that women with bipolar disorder receive appropriate care.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathumccts_pubs/147
dc.contributor.departmentSystems and Psychosocial Advances Research Center
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pagesappips201800133


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