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dc.contributor.authorRichmond, Jillian M
dc.contributor.authorStrassner, James P.
dc.contributor.authorRashighi, Medhi
dc.contributor.authorAgarwal, Priti
dc.contributor.authorGarg, Madhuri
dc.contributor.authorEssien, Kingsley I.
dc.contributor.authorPell, Lila S.
dc.contributor.authorHarris, John E.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:02.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:29:31Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:29:31Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-01
dc.date.submitted2019-04-17
dc.identifier.citation<p>J Invest Dermatol. 2019 Apr;139(4):769-778. doi: 10.1016/j.jid.2018.10.032. Epub 2018 Nov 10. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2018.10.032">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn0022-202X (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jid.2018.10.032
dc.identifier.pmid30423329
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50336
dc.description.abstractTissue resident memory T cells (Trm) form in the skin in vitiligo and persist to maintain disease, as white spots often recur rapidly after discontinuing therapy. We and others have recently described melanocyte-specific autoreactive Trm in vitiligo lesions. Here, we characterize the functional relationship between Trm and recirculating memory T cells (Tcm) in our vitiligo mouse model. We found that both Trm and Tcm sensed autoantigen in the skin long after stabilization of disease, producing IFN-gamma, CXCL9, and CXCL10. Blockade of Tcm recruitment to the skin with FTY720 or depletion of Tcm with low-dose Thy1.1 antibody reversed disease, indicating that Trm cooperate with Tcm to maintain disease. Taken together, our data provide characterization of skin memory T cells in vitiligo, demonstrate that Trm and Tcm work together during disease, and indicate that targeting their survival or function may provide novel, durable treatment options for patients.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=30423329&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2018.10.032
dc.subjectUMCCTS funding
dc.subjectDermatology
dc.subjectImmunity
dc.subjectSkin and Connective Tissue Diseases
dc.subjectTranslational Medical Research
dc.titleResident Memory and Recirculating Memory T Cells Cooperate to Maintain Disease in a Mouse Model of Vitiligo
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal of investigative dermatology
dc.source.volume139
dc.source.issue4
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/umccts_pubs/163
dc.identifier.contextkey14282377
html.description.abstract<p>Tissue resident memory T cells (Trm) form in the skin in vitiligo and persist to maintain disease, as white spots often recur rapidly after discontinuing therapy. We and others have recently described melanocyte-specific autoreactive Trm in vitiligo lesions. Here, we characterize the functional relationship between Trm and recirculating memory T cells (Tcm) in our vitiligo mouse model. We found that both Trm and Tcm sensed autoantigen in the skin long after stabilization of disease, producing IFN-gamma, CXCL9, and CXCL10. Blockade of Tcm recruitment to the skin with FTY720 or depletion of Tcm with low-dose Thy1.1 antibody reversed disease, indicating that Trm cooperate with Tcm to maintain disease. Taken together, our data provide characterization of skin memory T cells in vitiligo, demonstrate that Trm and Tcm work together during disease, and indicate that targeting their survival or function may provide novel, durable treatment options for patients.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathumccts_pubs/163
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Dermatology
dc.source.pages769-778


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