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dc.contributor.authorKundu, Amartya
dc.contributor.authorO'Day, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorShaikh, Amir Y.
dc.contributor.authorLessard, Darleen M.
dc.contributor.authorSaczynski, Jane S.
dc.contributor.authorYarzebski, Jorge L.
dc.contributor.authorDarling, Chad E.
dc.contributor.authorThabet, Ramses
dc.contributor.authorAkhter, Mohammed W.
dc.contributor.authorFloyd, Kevin C.
dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, Robert J.
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, David D.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:03.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:30:24Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:30:24Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-15
dc.date.submitted2016-08-31
dc.identifier.citation<p>Am J Cardiol. 2016 Apr 15;117(8):1213-8. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2016.01.012. Epub 2016 Jan 28. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2016.01.012">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn0002-9149 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.amjcard.2016.01.012
dc.identifier.pmid26874548
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50511
dc.description.abstractAtrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and contributes to high rates of in-hospital adverse events. However, there are few contemporary studies examining rates of AF in the contemporary era of AMI or the impact of new-onset AF on key in-hospital and postdischarge outcomes. We examined trends in AF in 6,384 residents of Worcester, Massachusetts, who were hospitalized with confirmed AMI during 7 biennial periods between 1999 and 2011. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between occurrence of AF and various in-hospital and postdischarge complications. The overall incidence of AF complicating AMI was 10.8%. Rates of new-onset AF increased from 1999 to 2003 (9.8% to 13.2%), and decreased thereafter. In multivariable adjusted models, patients developing new-onset AF after AMI were at a higher risk for in-hospital stroke (odds ratio [OR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6 to 4.1), heart failure (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.7 to 2.4), cardiogenic shock (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.8 to 4.9), and death (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.9 to 3.0) than patients without AF. Development of AF during hospitalization for AMI was associated with higher rates of readmission within 30 days after discharge (21.7% vs 16.0%), but no significant difference was noted in early postdischarge 30-day all-cause mortality rates (8.3% vs 5.1%). In conclusion, new-onset AF after AMI is strongly related to in-hospital complications of AMI and higher short-term readmission rates.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=26874548&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5075423/
dc.subjectUMCCTS funding
dc.subjectCardiology
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseases
dc.subjectClinical Epidemiology
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectTranslational Medical Research
dc.titleRelation of Atrial Fibrillation in Acute Myocardial Infarction to In-Hospital Complications and Early Hospital Readmission
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe American journal of cardiology
dc.source.volume117
dc.source.issue8
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/umccts_pubs/80
dc.identifier.contextkey9058436
html.description.abstract<p>Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and contributes to high rates of in-hospital adverse events. However, there are few contemporary studies examining rates of AF in the contemporary era of AMI or the impact of new-onset AF on key in-hospital and postdischarge outcomes. We examined trends in AF in 6,384 residents of Worcester, Massachusetts, who were hospitalized with confirmed AMI during 7 biennial periods between 1999 and 2011. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between occurrence of AF and various in-hospital and postdischarge complications. The overall incidence of AF complicating AMI was 10.8%. Rates of new-onset AF increased from 1999 to 2003 (9.8% to 13.2%), and decreased thereafter. In multivariable adjusted models, patients developing new-onset AF after AMI were at a higher risk for in-hospital stroke (odds ratio [OR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6 to 4.1), heart failure (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.7 to 2.4), cardiogenic shock (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.8 to 4.9), and death (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.9 to 3.0) than patients without AF. Development of AF during hospitalization for AMI was associated with higher rates of readmission within 30 days after discharge (21.7% vs 16.0%), but no significant difference was noted in early postdischarge 30-day all-cause mortality rates (8.3% vs 5.1%). In conclusion, new-onset AF after AMI is strongly related to in-hospital complications of AMI and higher short-term readmission rates.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathumccts_pubs/80
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Emergency Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine
dc.source.pages1213-8


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