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dc.contributor.authorHebert, James R.
dc.contributor.authorStoddard, Anne M.
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Donald R.
dc.contributor.authorSorensen, Glorian
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Mary K.
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Diane H.
dc.contributor.authorOckene, Judith K.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:04.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:31:49Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:31:49Z
dc.date.issued1993-11-01
dc.date.submitted2008-02-08
dc.identifier.citation<p>Ann Epidemiol. 1993 Nov;3(6):629-35.</p>
dc.identifier.issn1047-2797 (Print)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/1047-2797(93)90086-J
dc.identifier.pmid7921311
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50818
dc.description.abstractAlthough current dietary guidelines focus on a combination of specific nutrients and food items, most effective dietary interventions focus on patterns of dietary intake and take into account the relationships among nutritional factors. In a controlled nutrition intervention conducted at 16 workplaces, a self-administered health habits questionnaire (HHQ) including a 67-item version of a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was distributed prior to a 15-month intervention and again after it. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to reduce this large set of highly correlated FFQ food items to a smaller set of maximally uncorrelated components (PCs). Of the eight discrete food-based eating patterns targeted in the Treatwell intervention, six were highly correlated ([r[ > or = 0.48) with at least one PC each. This indicates a high level of concordance between a priori intervention targets and actual behavior. Based on log-transformed preintervention FFQ measures, our results showed that a very high proportion (0.55) of the variance in the FFQ data was explained by the PCs. A significantly greater increase in consumption of total vegetables and a larger decrease in dietary intake of ground and processed meats were observed among intervention companies. A comparison PCA conducted on intervention and control companies after the intervention indicated that patterns of intake were very stable over time.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7921311&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1016/1047-2797(93)90086-J
dc.subjectEating
dc.subject*Food Habits
dc.subject*Health Promotion
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subject*Nutrition Physiology
dc.subjectWorkplace
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.subjectWomen's Studies
dc.titleMeasuring the effect of a worksite-based nutrition intervention on food consumption
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAnnals of epidemiology
dc.source.volume3
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/wfc_pp/346
dc.identifier.contextkey424506
html.description.abstract<p>Although current dietary guidelines focus on a combination of specific nutrients and food items, most effective dietary interventions focus on patterns of dietary intake and take into account the relationships among nutritional factors. In a controlled nutrition intervention conducted at 16 workplaces, a self-administered health habits questionnaire (HHQ) including a 67-item version of a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was distributed prior to a 15-month intervention and again after it. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to reduce this large set of highly correlated FFQ food items to a smaller set of maximally uncorrelated components (PCs). Of the eight discrete food-based eating patterns targeted in the Treatwell intervention, six were highly correlated ([r[ > or = 0.48) with at least one PC each. This indicates a high level of concordance between a priori intervention targets and actual behavior. Based on log-transformed preintervention FFQ measures, our results showed that a very high proportion (0.55) of the variance in the FFQ data was explained by the PCs. A significantly greater increase in consumption of total vegetables and a larger decrease in dietary intake of ground and processed meats were observed among intervention companies. A comparison PCA conducted on intervention and control companies after the intervention indicated that patterns of intake were very stable over time.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathwfc_pp/346
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages629-35


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