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dc.contributor.authorOckene, Judith K.
dc.contributor.authorZapka, Jane G.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:04.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:31:54Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:31:54Z
dc.date.issued1998-01-14
dc.date.submitted2008-02-12
dc.identifier.citation<p>Addict Behav. 1997 Nov-Dec;22(6):835-48.</p>
dc.identifier.issn0306-4603 (Print)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0306-4603(97)00065-8
dc.identifier.pmid9426801
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50841
dc.description.abstractIt is well established that physicians can have a significant effect on the smoking behavior of their patients. To do this, attention must be paid to putting in place multiple strategies or mechanisms in the organization where the physician practices, as well as in the macroenvironment (i.e., social and public policy). It has been questioned whether or not there is stagnation in the field of clinical smoking intervention requiring a rededication to basic research regarding smoking. With respect to physician-based smoking intervention, we alternatively suggest that recommitment to all phases of research is essential for moving forward physician-based smoking interventions in the rapidly changing health services and social environment. In this article, we first review the essential framework of the National Cancer Institute's research science approach to cancer prevention and control. Evidence concerning physician-based interventions is then reviewed, followed by a schematic of a comprehensive framework for thinking about the process and intervention components needed for physician-based smoking intervention to take place in the health-care setting, the impact they have, and the eventual outcome of such interventions. There is a discussion of the challenges for the delivery of smoking-cessation services presented by the rapidly changing healthy delivery system of the 1990s. Finally, we present recommendations concerning research priorities for physician-based smoking intervention and the research funding process.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9426801&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0306-4603(97)00065-8
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subject*Physician-Patient Relations
dc.subject*Smoking Cessation
dc.subjectTobacco Use Disorder
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.subjectWomen's Studies
dc.titlePhysician-based smoking intervention: a rededication to a five-step strategy to smoking research
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAddictive behaviors
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/wfc_pp/370
dc.identifier.contextkey426172
html.description.abstract<p>It is well established that physicians can have a significant effect on the smoking behavior of their patients. To do this, attention must be paid to putting in place multiple strategies or mechanisms in the organization where the physician practices, as well as in the macroenvironment (i.e., social and public policy). It has been questioned whether or not there is stagnation in the field of clinical smoking intervention requiring a rededication to basic research regarding smoking. With respect to physician-based smoking intervention, we alternatively suggest that recommitment to all phases of research is essential for moving forward physician-based smoking interventions in the rapidly changing health services and social environment. In this article, we first review the essential framework of the National Cancer Institute's research science approach to cancer prevention and control. Evidence concerning physician-based interventions is then reviewed, followed by a schematic of a comprehensive framework for thinking about the process and intervention components needed for physician-based smoking intervention to take place in the health-care setting, the impact they have, and the eventual outcome of such interventions. There is a discussion of the challenges for the delivery of smoking-cessation services presented by the rapidly changing healthy delivery system of the 1990s. Finally, we present recommendations concerning research priorities for physician-based smoking intervention and the research funding process.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathwfc_pp/370
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages835-48


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