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dc.contributor.authorAdams, Abigail
dc.contributor.authorOckene, Judith K.
dc.contributor.authorWheeler, Elizabeth V.
dc.contributor.authorHurley, Thomas G.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:04.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:31:56Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:31:56Z
dc.date.issued1998-11-03
dc.date.submitted2008-02-12
dc.identifier.citation<p>J Gen Intern Med. 1998 Oct;13(10):692-8.</p>
dc.identifier.issn0884-8734 (Print)
dc.identifier.pmid9798817
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50846
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the use of a brief provider-delivered alcohol counseling intervention of 5 to 10 minutes with high-risk drinking patients by primary care provider* trained in the counseling intervention and provided with an office support system. DESIGN: A group randomized study design was used. Office sites were randomized to either a usual care or special intervention condition, within which physicians and patients were nested. The unit of analysis was the patient. SETTING: Primary care internal medicine practices affiliated with an academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-nine providers were randomized by practice site to receive training and an office support system to provide an alcohol counseling special intervention or to continue to provide usual care. INTERVENTION: Special intervention providers received 2 1/2 hours of training in a brief alcohol-counseling intervention and were then supported by an office system that screened patients, cued providers to intervene, and made patient education materials available as tip sheets. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Implementation of the counseling steps was measured by patient exit interviews (PEI) immediately following the patient visit. The interval between the date of training and the date of the PEI ranged from 6 to 32 months. Special intervention providers were twice as likely as usual care providers to discuss alcohol use with their patients. They carried out every step of the counseling sequence significantly more often than did usual care providers (p < .001). This intervention effect persisted over the 32 months of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians and other health-care providers trained in a brief provider-delivered alcohol intervention will counsel their high-risk drinking patients when cued to do so and supported by a primary care office system.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9798817&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1500899/
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAlcoholism
dc.subjectAttitude of Health Personnel
dc.subjectCounseling
dc.subjectEducation, Medical, Continuing
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectInternal Medicine
dc.subjectIntervention Studies
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMassachusetts
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectPatient Education as Topic
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.subjectWomen's Studies
dc.titleAlcohol counseling: physicians will do it
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of general internal medicine : official journal of the Society for Research and Education in Primary Care Internal Medicine
dc.source.volume13
dc.source.issue10
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/wfc_pp/375
dc.identifier.contextkey426177
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVE: To assess the use of a brief provider-delivered alcohol counseling intervention of 5 to 10 minutes with high-risk drinking patients by primary care provider* trained in the counseling intervention and provided with an office support system.</p> <p>DESIGN: A group randomized study design was used. Office sites were randomized to either a usual care or special intervention condition, within which physicians and patients were nested. The unit of analysis was the patient.</p> <p>SETTING: Primary care internal medicine practices affiliated with an academic medical center.</p> <p>PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-nine providers were randomized by practice site to receive training and an office support system to provide an alcohol counseling special intervention or to continue to provide usual care.</p> <p>INTERVENTION: Special intervention providers received 2 1/2 hours of training in a brief alcohol-counseling intervention and were then supported by an office system that screened patients, cued providers to intervene, and made patient education materials available as tip sheets.</p> <p>MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Implementation of the counseling steps was measured by patient exit interviews (PEI) immediately following the patient visit. The interval between the date of training and the date of the PEI ranged from 6 to 32 months. Special intervention providers were twice as likely as usual care providers to discuss alcohol use with their patients. They carried out every step of the counseling sequence significantly more often than did usual care providers (p < .001). This intervention effect persisted over the 32 months of follow-up.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Physicians and other health-care providers trained in a brief provider-delivered alcohol intervention will counsel their high-risk drinking patients when cued to do so and supported by a primary care office system.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathwfc_pp/375
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages692-8


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