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dc.contributor.authorSorensen, Glorian
dc.contributor.authorStoddard, Anne M.
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Mary K.
dc.contributor.authorHebert, James R.
dc.contributor.authorOckene, Judith K.
dc.contributor.authorAvrunin, Jill S.
dc.contributor.authorHimmelstein, Jay S.
dc.contributor.authorHammond, S. Katharine
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:04.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:31:56Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:31:56Z
dc.date.issued1998-11-10
dc.date.submitted2008-02-12
dc.identifier.citation<p>Am J Public Health. 1998 Nov;88(11):1685-90.</p>
dc.identifier.issn0090-0036 (Print)
dc.identifier.pmid9807537
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50847
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: This study assessed the effects of a 2-year integrated health promotion-health protection work-site intervention on changes in dietary habits and cigarette smoking. METHODS: A randomized, controlled intervention study used the work site as the unit of intervention and analysis; it included 24 predominantly manufacturing work sites in Massachusetts (250-2500 workers per site). Behaviors were assessed in self-administered surveys (n = 2386; completion rates = 61% at baseline, 62% at final). Three key intervention elements targeted health behavior change: (1) joint worker-management participation in program planning and implementation, (2) consultation with management on work-site environmental changes, and (3) health education programs. RESULTS: Significant differences between intervention and control work sites included reductions in the percentage of calories consumed as fat (2.3% vs 1.5% kcal) and increases in servings of fruit and vegetables (10% vs 4% increase). The intervention had a significant effect on fiber consumption among skilled and unskilled laborers. No significant effects were observed for smoking cessation. CONCLUSIONS: Although the size of the effects of this intervention are modest, on a populationwide basis effects of this size could have a large impact on cancer-related and coronary heart disease end points.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9807537&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1508574/
dc.subject*Diet
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subject*Health Behavior
dc.subjectHealth Education
dc.subjectHealth Promotion
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMassachusetts
dc.subjectOccupational Health Services
dc.subjectProgram Evaluation
dc.subjectQuestionnaires
dc.subjectSmoking
dc.subjectWorkplace
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.subjectWomen's Studies
dc.titleThe effects of a health promotion-health protection intervention on behavior change: the WellWorks Study
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleAmerican journal of public health
dc.source.volume88
dc.source.issue11
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/wfc_pp/376
dc.identifier.contextkey426178
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the effects of a 2-year integrated health promotion-health protection work-site intervention on changes in dietary habits and cigarette smoking.</p> <p>METHODS: A randomized, controlled intervention study used the work site as the unit of intervention and analysis; it included 24 predominantly manufacturing work sites in Massachusetts (250-2500 workers per site). Behaviors were assessed in self-administered surveys (n = 2386; completion rates = 61% at baseline, 62% at final). Three key intervention elements targeted health behavior change: (1) joint worker-management participation in program planning and implementation, (2) consultation with management on work-site environmental changes, and (3) health education programs.</p> <p>RESULTS: Significant differences between intervention and control work sites included reductions in the percentage of calories consumed as fat (2.3% vs 1.5% kcal) and increases in servings of fruit and vegetables (10% vs 4% increase). The intervention had a significant effect on fiber consumption among skilled and unskilled laborers. No significant effects were observed for smoking cessation.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Although the size of the effects of this intervention are modest, on a populationwide basis effects of this size could have a large impact on cancer-related and coronary heart disease end points.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathwfc_pp/376
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicine and Community Health
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages1685-90


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