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dc.contributor.authorPbert, Lori
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Abigail
dc.contributor.authorQuirk, Mark E.
dc.contributor.authorHebert, James R.
dc.contributor.authorOckene, Judith K.
dc.contributor.authorLuippold, Rose S.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:04.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:31:56Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:31:56Z
dc.date.issued1999-03-01
dc.date.submitted2008-02-12
dc.identifier.citation<p>Health Psychol. 1999 Mar;18(2):183-8.</p>
dc.identifier.issn0278-6133 (Print)
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/0278-6133.18.2.183
dc.identifier.pmid10194054
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50849
dc.description.abstractIn evaluating the efficacy of physician-delivered counseling interventions for health behavior changes such as smoking cessation, a major challenge is determining the degree to which interventions are implemented by physicians. The Patient Exit Interview (PEI; J. Ockene et al., 1991) is a brief measure of a patient's perception of the content and quantity of smoking cessation intervention received from his or her physician. One hundred eight current smokers seen in a primary care clinic completed a PEI following their physician visit. Participants were 45% male, 95% Caucasian, with a mean age of 42 years and an average of 22 years of smoking. The PEI correlated well with a criterion measure of an audiotape assessment of the physician-patient interaction (r = .67, p < .001). When discrepancy occurred, in general it was due to patients' over-reporting of intervention as compared with the criterion measure. Implications and limitations of these findings are discussed.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10194054&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.18.2.183
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subject*Interview, Psychological
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subject*Physician-Patient Relations
dc.subjectPrimary Health Care
dc.subjectSmoking Cessation
dc.subjectTreatment Outcome
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.subjectWomen's Studies
dc.titleThe patient exit interview as an assessment of physician-delivered smoking intervention: a validation study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleHealth psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association
dc.source.volume18
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/wfc_pp/381
dc.identifier.contextkey426183
html.description.abstract<p>In evaluating the efficacy of physician-delivered counseling interventions for health behavior changes such as smoking cessation, a major challenge is determining the degree to which interventions are implemented by physicians. The Patient Exit Interview (PEI; J. Ockene et al., 1991) is a brief measure of a patient's perception of the content and quantity of smoking cessation intervention received from his or her physician. One hundred eight current smokers seen in a primary care clinic completed a PEI following their physician visit. Participants were 45% male, 95% Caucasian, with a mean age of 42 years and an average of 22 years of smoking. The PEI correlated well with a criterion measure of an audiotape assessment of the physician-patient interaction (r = .67, p < .001). When discrepancy occurred, in general it was due to patients' over-reporting of intervention as compared with the criterion measure. Implications and limitations of these findings are discussed.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathwfc_pp/381
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicine and Community Health
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages183-8


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