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dc.contributor.authorOckene, Ira S.
dc.contributor.authorHebert, James R.
dc.contributor.authorOckene, Judith K.
dc.contributor.authorSaperia, Gordon M.
dc.contributor.authorStanek, Edward J. III
dc.contributor.authorNicolosi, Robert J.
dc.contributor.authorMerriam, Philip A.
dc.contributor.authorHurley, Thomas G.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:04.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:31:57Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:31:57Z
dc.date.issued1999-04-12
dc.date.submitted2008-02-12
dc.identifier.citation<p>Arch Intern Med. 1999 Apr 12;159(7):725-31.</p>
dc.identifier.issn0003-9926 (Print)
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/archinte.159.7.725
dc.identifier.pmid10218753
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50850
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of a training program for physician-delivered nutrition counseling, alone and in combination with an office-support program, on dietary fat intake, weight, and blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with hyperlipidemia. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Forty-five primary care internists at the Fallon Community Health Plan, a central Massachusetts health maintenance organization, were randomized by site into 3 groups: (1) usual care; (2) physician nutrition counseling training; and (3) physician nutrition counseling training plus an office-support program. Eleven hundred sixty-two of their patients with blood total cholesterol levels in the highest 25th percentile, having previously scheduled physician visits, were recruited. Physicians in groups 2 and 3 attended a 3-hour training program on the use of brief patient-centered interactive counseling and the use of an office-support program that included in-office prompts, algorithms, and simple dietary assessment tools. Primary outcome measures included change at 1-year of follow-up in percentage of energy intake from saturated fat; weight; and blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. RESULTS: Improvement was seen in all 3 primary outcome measures, but was limited to patients in group 3. Compared with group 1, patients in group 3 had average reductions of 1.1 percentage points in percent of energy from saturated fat (a 10.3% decrease) (P = .01); a reduction in weight of 2.3 kg (PCONCLUSION: Brief supported physician nutrition counseling can produce beneficial changes in diet, weight, and blood lipids.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10218753&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.159.7.725
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subject*Body Weight
dc.subjectCounseling
dc.subjectDietary Fats
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHealth Maintenance Organizations
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subject*Hyperlipidemias
dc.subjectInternal Medicine
dc.subjectLipids
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMassachusetts
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectNutrition Physiology
dc.subjectPatient Education as Topic
dc.subject*Physicians
dc.subjectPrimary Health Care
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.subjectWomen's Studies
dc.titleEffect of physician-delivered nutrition counseling training and an office-support program on saturated fat intake, weight, and serum lipid measurements in a hyperlipidemic population: Worcester Area Trial for Counseling in Hyperlipidemia (WATCH)
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleArchives of internal medicine
dc.source.volume159
dc.source.issue7
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/wfc_pp/382
dc.identifier.contextkey426184
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of a training program for physician-delivered nutrition counseling, alone and in combination with an office-support program, on dietary fat intake, weight, and blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with hyperlipidemia.</p> <p>PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Forty-five primary care internists at the Fallon Community Health Plan, a central Massachusetts health maintenance organization, were randomized by site into 3 groups: (1) usual care; (2) physician nutrition counseling training; and (3) physician nutrition counseling training plus an office-support program. Eleven hundred sixty-two of their patients with blood total cholesterol levels in the highest 25th percentile, having previously scheduled physician visits, were recruited. Physicians in groups 2 and 3 attended a 3-hour training program on the use of brief patient-centered interactive counseling and the use of an office-support program that included in-office prompts, algorithms, and simple dietary assessment tools. Primary outcome measures included change at 1-year of follow-up in percentage of energy intake from saturated fat; weight; and blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels.</p> <p>RESULTS: Improvement was seen in all 3 primary outcome measures, but was limited to patients in group 3. Compared with group 1, patients in group 3 had average reductions of 1.1 percentage points in percent of energy from saturated fat (a 10.3% decrease) (P = .01); a reduction in weight of 2.3 kg (PCONCLUSION: Brief supported physician nutrition counseling can produce beneficial changes in diet, weight, and blood lipids.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathwfc_pp/382
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages725-31


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