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dc.contributor.authorReiff-Hekking, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorOckene, Judith K.
dc.contributor.authorHurley, Thomas G.
dc.contributor.authorReed, George W.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:05.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:32:09Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:32:09Z
dc.date.issued2005-01-01
dc.date.submitted2008-02-26
dc.identifier.citation<p>J Gen Intern Med. 2005 Jan;20(1):7-13. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1525-1497.2005.21240.x">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1525-1497 (Electronic)
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1525-1497.2005.21240.x
dc.identifier.pmid15693921
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50895
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a brief primary care provider-delivered counseling intervention on the reduction of alcohol consumption by high-risk drinkers. The intervention was implemented as part of routine primary care medical practice. METHODS: We performed a controlled clinical trial with 6- and 12-month follow-up. Three primary care practices affiliated with an academic medical center were randomly assigned to special intervention (SI) or usual care (UC). A total of 9,772 primary care patients were screened for high-risk drinking. A fourth site was added later. From the group that was screened, 530 high-risk drinkers entered into the study, with 447 providing follow-up at 12 months. The intervention consisted of brief (5-10 minute) patient-centered counseling plus an office system that cued providers to intervene and provided patient educational materials. RESULTS: At 12-month follow-up, after controlling for baseline differences in alcohol consumption, SI participants had significantly larger changes (P=.03) in weekly alcohol intake compared to UC (SI=-5.7 drinks per week; UC=-3.1 drinks per week), and of those who changed to safe drinking at 6 months more SI participants maintained that change at 12 months than UC. CONCLUSIONS: Project Health provides evidence that screening and very brief (5-10 minute) advice and counseling delivered by a patient's personal physician or nurse practitioner as a routine part of a primary care visit can reduce alcohol consumption by high-risk drinkers.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15693921&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1490034/
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAlcohol Drinking
dc.subject*Counseling
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectInternal Medicine
dc.subjectLife Style
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectNurse Practitioners
dc.subjectPatient Education as Topic
dc.subjectPhysicians
dc.subjectPrimary Health Care
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.subjectWomen's Studies
dc.titleBrief physician and nurse practitioner-delivered counseling for high-risk drinking. Results at 12-month follow-up
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of general internal medicine : official journal of the Society for Research and Education in Primary Care Internal Medicine
dc.source.volume20
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/wfc_pp/424
dc.identifier.contextkey437180
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a brief primary care provider-delivered counseling intervention on the reduction of alcohol consumption by high-risk drinkers. The intervention was implemented as part of routine primary care medical practice.</p> <p>METHODS: We performed a controlled clinical trial with 6- and 12-month follow-up. Three primary care practices affiliated with an academic medical center were randomly assigned to special intervention (SI) or usual care (UC). A total of 9,772 primary care patients were screened for high-risk drinking. A fourth site was added later. From the group that was screened, 530 high-risk drinkers entered into the study, with 447 providing follow-up at 12 months. The intervention consisted of brief (5-10 minute) patient-centered counseling plus an office system that cued providers to intervene and provided patient educational materials.</p> <p>RESULTS: At 12-month follow-up, after controlling for baseline differences in alcohol consumption, SI participants had significantly larger changes (P=.03) in weekly alcohol intake compared to UC (SI=-5.7 drinks per week; UC=-3.1 drinks per week), and of those who changed to safe drinking at 6 months more SI participants maintained that change at 12 months than UC.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Project Health provides evidence that screening and very brief (5-10 minute) advice and counseling delivered by a patient's personal physician or nurse practitioner as a routine part of a primary care visit can reduce alcohol consumption by high-risk drinkers.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathwfc_pp/424
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages7-13


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