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dc.contributor.authorCnattingius, Sven
dc.contributor.authorAkre, Olof
dc.contributor.authorLambe, Mats
dc.contributor.authorOckene, Judith K.
dc.contributor.authorGranath, Fredrik
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:05.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:32:16Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:32:16Z
dc.date.issued2006-12-01
dc.date.submitted2008-03-04
dc.identifier.citationAm J Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Dec;195(6):1680-6. Epub 2006 Oct 2. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2006.06.071">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1097-6868 (Electronic)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ajog.2006.06.071
dc.identifier.pmid17014811
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50914
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to study the effect of pregnancy outcomes on risks of continued smoking in subsequent pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study of first and second single births among 98,778 Swedish women who were daily smokers in first pregnancy. RESULTS: In all, 70.2% of women continued to smoke in second pregnancy. Compared with women with a previous normal pregnancy outcome, risk of smoking in second pregnancy was increased among women with a previous small-for-gestational-age birth (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 95% CI 1.28 [95% CI 1.19-1.37]), and reduced among women who had experienced a stillbirth (OR 0.76 [95% CI 0.63-0.93]) or an infant death because of congenital malformations (OR 0.67 [95% CI 0.49-0.92]. A previous preterm birth, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, and other causes of infant death did not influence risk. CONCLUSION: A previous adverse pregnancy outcome has only a modest influence on smoking habits in the successive pregnancy.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17014811&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2006.06.071
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectCohort Studies
dc.subjectCongenital Abnormalities
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectInfant, Newborn
dc.subject*Infant, Small for Gestational Age
dc.subjectMedical Records
dc.subjectPregnancy
dc.subjectPrevalence
dc.subjectRegistries
dc.subjectRisk Assessment
dc.subject*Smoking
dc.subject*Smoking Cessation
dc.subject*Stillbirth
dc.subjectSudden Infant Death
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.subjectWomen's Studies
dc.titleWill an adverse pregnancy outcome influence the risk of continued smoking in the next pregnancy
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
dc.source.volume195
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/wfc_pp/441
dc.identifier.contextkey447497
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to study the effect of pregnancy outcomes on risks of continued smoking in subsequent pregnancy.</p> <p>STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study of first and second single births among 98,778 Swedish women who were daily smokers in first pregnancy.</p> <p>RESULTS: In all, 70.2% of women continued to smoke in second pregnancy. Compared with women with a previous normal pregnancy outcome, risk of smoking in second pregnancy was increased among women with a previous small-for-gestational-age birth (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 95% CI 1.28 [95% CI 1.19-1.37]), and reduced among women who had experienced a stillbirth (OR 0.76 [95% CI 0.63-0.93]) or an infant death because of congenital malformations (OR 0.67 [95% CI 0.49-0.92]. A previous preterm birth, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, and other causes of infant death did not influence risk.</p> <p>CONCLUSION: A previous adverse pregnancy outcome has only a modest influence on smoking habits in the successive pregnancy.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathwfc_pp/441
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages1680-6


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