Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBrunner, Robert L.
dc.contributor.authorDunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.authorLeBoff, Meryl S.
dc.contributor.authorGranek, I.
dc.contributor.authorBowen, Deborah J.
dc.contributor.authorSnetselaar, Linda G.
dc.contributor.authorShumaker, Sally A.
dc.contributor.authorOckene, Judith K.
dc.contributor.authorRosal, Milagros C
dc.contributor.authorWactawski-Wende, Jean
dc.contributor.authorCauley, Jane A.
dc.contributor.authorCochrane, Barbara B.
dc.contributor.authorTinker, Lesley F.
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Rebecca D.
dc.contributor.authorWang, C. Y.
dc.contributor.authorWu, L.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:11:05.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:32:30Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:32:30Z
dc.date.issued2009-12-01
dc.date.submitted2010-03-03
dc.identifier.citation<p>Behav Med. 2009 Winter;34(4):145-55. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/BMED.34.4.145-155">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn0896-4289 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.3200/BMED.34.4.145-155
dc.identifier.pmid19064373
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/50963
dc.description.abstractThe authors analyzed data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Calcium and Vitamin D Supplementation Trial (CaD) to learn more about factors affecting adherence to clinical trial study pills (both active and placebo). Most participants (36,282 postmenopausal women aged 50-79 years) enrolled in CaD 1 year after joining either a hormone trial or the dietary modification trial of WHI. The WHI researchers measured adherence to study pills by weighing the amount of remaining pills at an annual study visit; adherence was primarily defined as taking > or = 80% of the pills. The authors in this study examined a number of behavioral, demographic, procedural, and treatment variables for association with study pill adherence. They found that relatively simple procedures (ie, phone contact early in the study [4 weeks post randomization] and direct social contact) later in the trial may improve adherence. Also, at baseline, past pill-use experiences, personal supplement use, and relevant symptoms may be predictive of adherence in a supplement trial.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=19064373&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3770154/
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAttitude to Health
dc.subjectCalcium, Dietary
dc.subject*Dietary Supplements
dc.subjectDouble-Blind Method
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectForecasting
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectLongitudinal Studies
dc.subjectMedication Adherence
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectPostmenopause
dc.subjectRisk Factors
dc.subjectVitamin D
dc.subject*Women's Health
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.subjectWomen's Studies
dc.titlePredictors of adherence in the Women's Health Initiative Calcium and Vitamin D Trial
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleBehavioral medicine (Washington, D.C.)
dc.source.volume34
dc.source.issue4
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/wfc_pp/493
dc.identifier.contextkey1192100
html.description.abstract<p>The authors analyzed data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Calcium and Vitamin D Supplementation Trial (CaD) to learn more about factors affecting adherence to clinical trial study pills (both active and placebo). Most participants (36,282 postmenopausal women aged 50-79 years) enrolled in CaD 1 year after joining either a hormone trial or the dietary modification trial of WHI. The WHI researchers measured adherence to study pills by weighing the amount of remaining pills at an annual study visit; adherence was primarily defined as taking > or = 80% of the pills. The authors in this study examined a number of behavioral, demographic, procedural, and treatment variables for association with study pill adherence. They found that relatively simple procedures (ie, phone contact early in the study [4 weeks post randomization] and direct social contact) later in the trial may improve adherence. Also, at baseline, past pill-use experiences, personal supplement use, and relevant symptoms may be predictive of adherence in a supplement trial.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathwfc_pp/493
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages145-55


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record