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dc.contributor.authorMattocks, Kristin M.
dc.contributor.authorKroll-Desrosiers, Aimee
dc.contributor.authorMoore Simas, Tiffany A.
dc.contributor.authorBastian, Lori A
dc.contributor.authorMarteeny, Valerie
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Lorrie
dc.contributor.authorSheahan, Kate
dc.contributor.authorElwy, A Rani
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-28T14:45:42Z
dc.date.available2022-09-28T14:45:42Z
dc.date.issued2022-08-30
dc.identifier.citationMattocks KM, Kroll-Desrosiers A, Moore Simas TA, Bastian LA, Marteeny V, Walker L, Sheahan K, Elwy AR. Examining Pregnant Veterans' Acceptance and Beliefs Regarding the COVID-19 Vaccine. J Gen Intern Med. 2022 Sep;37(Suppl 3):671-678. doi: 10.1007/s11606-022-07588-0. Epub 2022 Aug 30. PMID: 36042080; PMCID: PMC9427157.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1525-1497
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11606-022-07588-0en_US
dc.identifier.pmid36042080
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/51136
dc.description.abstractBackground: Pregnant persons have received mixed messages regarding whether or not to receive COVID-19 vaccines as limited data are available regarding vaccine safety for pregnant and lactating persons and breastfeeding infants. Objective: The aims of this study were to examine pregnant Veteran's acceptance of COVID-19 vaccines, along with perceptions and beliefs regarding vaccine safety and vaccine conspiracy beliefs. Design and participants: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of pregnant Veterans enrolled in VA care who were taking part in an ongoing cohort study at 15 VA medical centers between January and May 2021. Main measures: Pregnant Veterans were asked whether they had been offered the COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy, and whether they chose to accept or refuse it. Additional questions focused on perceptions of COVID-19 vaccine safety and endorsements of vaccine knowledge and conspiracy beliefs. Logistic regression was utilized to examine predictors of acceptance of a vaccine during pregnancy. Key results: Overall, 72 pregnant Veterans were offered a COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy; over two-thirds (69%) opted not to receive a vaccine. Reasons for not receiving a vaccine included potential effects on the baby (64%), side effects for oneself (30%), and immunity from a past COVID-19 infection (12%). Those who received a vaccine had significantly greater vaccine knowledge and less belief in vaccine conspiracy theories. Greater knowledge of vaccines in general (aOR: 1.78; 95% CI: 1.2-2.6) and lower beliefs in vaccine conspiracies (aOR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.6-0.9) were the strongest predictors of acceptance of a COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy. Conclusions: Our study provides important insights regarding pregnant Veterans' decisions to accept the COVID-19 vaccine, and reasons why they may choose not to accept the vaccine. Given the high endorsement of vaccine conspiracy beliefs, trusted healthcare providers should have ongoing, open discussions about vaccine conspiracy beliefs and provide additional information to dispel these beliefs.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of general internal medicineen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-022-07588-0en_US
dc.rights© 2022. The Author(s). This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectVeteransen_US
dc.subjectengagementen_US
dc.subjectperceptionen_US
dc.subjectvaccineen_US
dc.titleExamining Pregnant Veterans' Acceptance and Beliefs Regarding the COVID-19 Vaccineen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of general internal medicine
dc.source.volume37
dc.source.issueSuppl 3
dc.source.beginpage671
dc.source.endpage678
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalJournal of general internal medicine
refterms.dateFOA2022-09-28T14:45:42Z
dc.contributor.departmentObstetrics and Gynecologyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPopulation and Quantitative Health Sciencesen_US


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© 2022. The Author(s). This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2022. The Author(s). This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.