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dc.contributor.authorMa, Kevin C
dc.contributor.authorHale, Jaime E
dc.contributor.authorGrad, Yonatan H
dc.contributor.authorAlter, Galit
dc.contributor.authorLuzuriaga, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorEaton, Roger B
dc.contributor.authorFischinger, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorKaur, Devinder
dc.contributor.authorBrody, Robin
dc.contributor.authorSiddiqui, Sameed M
dc.contributor.authorLeach, Dylan
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Catherine M
dc.contributor.authorKlevens, R Monina
dc.contributor.authorMadoff, Lawrence C.
dc.contributor.authorComeau, Anne Marie
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-05T15:49:56Z
dc.date.available2022-10-05T15:49:56Z
dc.date.issued2022-08-24
dc.identifier.citationMa KC, Hale JE, Grad YH, Alter G, Luzuriaga K, Eaton RB, Fischinger S, Kaur D, Brody R, Siddiqui SM, Leach D, Brown CM, Klevens RM, Madoff L, Comeau AM. Trends in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Seroprevalence in Massachusetts Estimated from Newborn Screening Specimens. Clin Infect Dis. 2022 Aug 24;75(1):e105-e113. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciac158. PMID: 35213690; PMCID: PMC8903451.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1537-6591
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/cid/ciac158en_US
dc.identifier.pmid35213690
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/51145
dc.descriptionThis article is based on a previously available preprint in medRxiv. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.10.29.21265678.
dc.description.abstractBackground: Estimating the cumulative incidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is essential for setting public health policies. We leveraged deidentified Massachusetts newborn screening specimens as an accessible, retrospective source of maternal antibodies for estimating statewide seroprevalence in a nontest-seeking population. Methods: We analyzed 72 117 newborn specimens collected from November 2019 through December 2020, representing 337 towns and cities across Massachusetts. Seroprevalence was estimated for the Massachusetts population after correcting for imperfect test specificity and nonrepresentative sampling using Bayesian multilevel regression and poststratification. Results: Statewide seroprevalence was estimated to be 0.03% (90% credible interval [CI], 0.00-0.11) in November 2019 and rose to 1.47% (90% CI: 1.00-2.13) by May 2020, following sustained SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the spring. Seroprevalence plateaued from May onward, reaching 2.15% (90% CI: 1.56-2.98) in December 2020. Seroprevalence varied substantially by community and was particularly associated with community percent non-Hispanic Black (β = .024; 90% CI: 0.004-0.044); i.e., a 10% increase in community percent non-Hispanic Black was associated with 27% higher odds of seropositivity. Seroprevalence estimates had good concordance with reported case counts and wastewater surveillance for most of 2020, prior to the resurgence of transmission in winter. Conclusions: Cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 protective antibody in Massachusetts was low as of December 2020, indicating that a substantial fraction of the population was still susceptible. Maternal seroprevalence data from newborn screening can inform longitudinal trends and identify cities and towns at highest risk, particularly in settings where widespread diagnostic testing is unavailable.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Infectious Diseasesen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciac158en_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.en_US
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2en_US
dc.subjectnewborn screeningen_US
dc.subjectseroprevalenceen_US
dc.subjectUMCCTS fundingen_US
dc.titleTrends in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Seroprevalence in Massachusetts Estimated from Newborn Screening Specimensen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleClinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
dc.source.volume75
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpagee105
dc.source.endpagee113
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalClinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Clinical and Translational Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPediatricsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Molecular Medicineen_US


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