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dc.contributor.authorHerbert, Carly
dc.contributor.authorBroach, John
dc.contributor.authorHeetderks, William
dc.contributor.authorQashu, Felicia
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Laura
dc.contributor.authorPretz, Caitlin
dc.contributor.authorWoods, Kelsey
dc.contributor.authorKheterpal, Vik
dc.contributor.authorSuvarna, Thejas
dc.contributor.authorNowak, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorLazar, Peter
dc.contributor.authorAyturk, Didem
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Bruce
dc.contributor.authorAchenbach, Chad
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Robert
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, David
dc.contributor.authorSoni, Apurv
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-24T13:49:32Z
dc.date.available2022-10-24T13:49:32Z
dc.date.issued2022-10-18
dc.identifier.citationHerbert C, Broach J, Heetderks W, Qashu F, Gibson L, Pretz C, Woods K, Kheterpal V, Suvarna T, Nowak C, Lazar P, Ayturk D, Barton B, Achenbach C, Murphy R, McManus D, Soni A. Feasibility of At-Home Serial Testing Using Over-the-Counter SARS-CoV-2 Tests With a Digital Smartphone App for Assistance: Longitudinal Cohort Study. JMIR Form Res. 2022 Oct 18;6(10):e35426. doi: 10.2196/35426. PMID: 36041004; PMCID: PMC9580993.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn2561-326X
dc.identifier.doi10.2196/35426en_US
dc.identifier.pmid36041004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/51196
dc.description.abstractBackground: The ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic necessitates the development of accurate, rapid, and affordable diagnostics to help curb disease transmission, morbidity, and mortality. Rapid antigen tests are important tools for scaling up testing for SARS-CoV-2; however, little is known about individuals' use of rapid antigen tests at home and how to facilitate the user experience. Objective: This study aimed to describe the feasibility and acceptability of serial self-testing with rapid antigen tests for SARS-CoV-2, including need for assistance and the reliability of self-interpretation. Methods: A total of 206 adults in the United States with smartphones were enrolled in this single-arm feasibility study in February and March 2021. All participants were asked to self-test for COVID-19 at home using rapid antigen tests daily for 14 days and use a smartphone app for testing assistance and to report their results. The main outcomes were adherence to the testing schedule, the acceptability of testing and smartphone app experiences, and the reliability of participants versus study team's interpretation of test results. Descriptive statistics were used to report the acceptability, adherence, overall rating, and experience of using the at-home test and MyDataHelps app. The usability, acceptability, adherence, and quality of at-home testing were analyzed across different sociodemographic, age, and educational attainment groups. Results: Of the 206 enrolled participants, 189 (91.7%) and 159 (77.2%) completed testing and follow-up surveys, respectively. In total, 51.3% (97/189) of study participants were women, the average age was 40.7 years, 34.4% (65/189) were non-White, and 82% (155/189) had a bachelor's degree or higher. Most (n=133/206, 64.6%) participants showed high testing adherence, meaning they completed over 75% of the assigned tests. Participants' interpretations of test results demonstrated high agreement (2106/2130, 98.9%) with the study verified results, with a κ score of 0.29 (P<.001). Participants reported high satisfaction with self-testing and the smartphone app, with 98.7% (157/159) reporting that they would recommend the self-test and smartphone app to others. These results were consistent across age, race/ethnicity, and gender. Conclusions: Participants' high adherence to the recommended testing schedule, significant reliability between participants and study staff's test interpretation, and the acceptability of the smartphone app and self-test indicate that self-tests for SARS-CoV-2 with a smartphone app for assistance and reporting is a highly feasible testing modality among a diverse population of adults in the United States.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJMIR Formative Researchen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.2196/35426en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Carly Herbert, John Broach, William Heetderks, Felicia Qashu, Laura Gibson, Caitlin Pretz, Kelsey Woods, Vik Kheterpal, Thejas Suvarna, Christopher Nowak, Peter Lazar, Didem Ayturk, Bruce Barton, Chad Achenbach, Robert Murphy, David McManus, Apurv Soni. Originally published in JMIR Formative Research (https://formative.jmir.org), 18.10.2022. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR Formative Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on https://formative.jmir.org, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectMyDataHelps smartphone appen_US
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2en_US
dc.subjectdigital healthen_US
dc.subjectmHealthen_US
dc.subjectmobile healthen_US
dc.subjectpandemicen_US
dc.subjectrapid testsen_US
dc.subjectself testen_US
dc.subjectserial self-testingen_US
dc.titleFeasibility of At-Home Serial Testing Using Over-the-Counter SARS-CoV-2 Tests With a Digital Smartphone App for Assistance: Longitudinal Cohort Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleJMIR formative research
dc.source.volume6
dc.source.issue10
dc.source.beginpagee35426
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryCanada
dc.identifier.journalJMIR formative research
refterms.dateFOA2022-10-24T13:49:33Z
dc.contributor.departmentEmergency Medicineen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMedicineen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPediatricsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPopulation and Quantitative Health Sciencesen_US


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Copyright © Carly Herbert, John Broach, William Heetderks, Felicia Qashu, Laura Gibson, Caitlin Pretz, Kelsey Woods, Vik Kheterpal, Thejas Suvarna, Christopher Nowak, Peter Lazar, Didem Ayturk, Bruce Barton, Chad Achenbach, Robert Murphy, David McManus, Apurv Soni. Originally published in JMIR Formative Research (https://formative.jmir.org), 18.10.2022. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR Formative Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on https://formative.jmir.org, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © Carly Herbert, John Broach, William Heetderks, Felicia Qashu, Laura Gibson, Caitlin Pretz, Kelsey Woods, Vik Kheterpal, Thejas Suvarna, Christopher Nowak, Peter Lazar, Didem Ayturk, Bruce Barton, Chad Achenbach, Robert Murphy, David McManus, Apurv Soni. Originally published in JMIR Formative Research (https://formative.jmir.org), 18.10.2022. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR Formative Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on https://formative.jmir.org, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.