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dc.contributor.authorProm, Maria C
dc.contributor.authorDenduluri, Amrutha
dc.contributor.authorPhilpotts, Lisa L
dc.contributor.authorRondon, Marta B
dc.contributor.authorBorba, Christina P C
dc.contributor.authorGelaye, Bizu
dc.contributor.authorByatt, Nancy
dc.date.accessioned2022-12-05T20:31:27Z
dc.date.available2022-12-05T20:31:27Z
dc.date.issued2022-03-14
dc.identifier.citationProm MC, Denduluri A, Philpotts LL, Rondon MB, Borba CPC, Gelaye B, Byatt N. A Systematic Review of Interventions That Integrate Perinatal Mental Health Care Into Routine Maternal Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Front Psychiatry. 2022 Mar 14;13:859341. doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2022.859341. PMID: 35360136; PMCID: PMC8964099.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1664-0640
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyt.2022.859341en_US
dc.identifier.pmid35360136
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/51372
dc.description.abstractBackground: Women in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are disproportionally affected by perinatal depression and anxiety and lack access to mental health care. Integrating perinatal mental health care into routine maternal care is recommended to address gaps in access to mental health care in such under-resourced settings. Understanding the effectiveness of interventions that integrate perinatal mental health care into routine maternal care in LMICs is critical to inform ongoing intervention development, implementation, and scale-up. This systematic review aims to assess the effectiveness of interventions that integrate perinatal mental health care into routine maternal care to improve maternal mental health and infant health outcomes in LMICs. Method: In accordance with the PRISMA guidelines, an electronic database search was conducted seeking publications of controlled trials examining interventions that aimed to integrate perinatal mental health care into routine maternal care in LMICs. Abstracts and full text articles were independently reviewed by two authors for inclusion utilizing Covidence Review Software. Data was extracted and narrative synthesis was conducted. Findings: Twenty studies met eligibility criteria from the initial search results of 2,382 unique citations. There was substantial heterogeneity between the study samples, intervention designs, and outcome assessments. Less than half of the studies focused on women with active depression or anxiety. Most studies (85%) implemented single intervention designs involving psychological, psychosocial, psychoeducational, or adjuvant emotion/stress management. There were few interventions utilizing multicomponent approaches, pharmacotherapy, or referral to mental health specialists. Outcome measures and assessment timing were highly variable. Eighteen studies demonstrated significantly greater improvement on depression and/or anxiety measures in the intervention group(s) as compared to control. Conclusion: Integrated interventions can be effective in LMICs. The findings provide a critical understanding of current interventions design gaps. This includes the lack of comprehensive intervention designs that incorporate increasing intensity of treatment for more severe illness, pharmacotherapy, mental health specialist referrals, and non-mental health professional training and supervision. The findings also provide strategies to overcome design and implementation barriers in LMICs. Study findings provide a foundation for future evidence-based adaptation, implementation, and scale-up of interventions that integrate perinatal mental health care into routine maternal care in LMICs. Systematic review registration: [https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_ record.php?ID=CRD42021259092], identifier [CRD42021259092].en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Psychiatryen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2022.859341en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 Prom, Denduluri, Philpotts, Rondon, Borba, Gelaye and Byatt. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectintegrated careen_US
dc.subjectlow- and middle-income countries (LMICs)en_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjectperinatal anxietyen_US
dc.subjectperinatal depressionen_US
dc.subjectsystematic reviewen_US
dc.titleA Systematic Review of Interventions That Integrate Perinatal Mental Health Care Into Routine Maternal Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countriesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleFrontiers in psychiatry
dc.source.volume13
dc.source.beginpage859341
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countrySwitzerland
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in psychiatry
refterms.dateFOA2022-12-05T20:31:28Z
dc.contributor.departmentPsychiatryen_US


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Copyright © 2022 Prom, Denduluri, Philpotts, Rondon, Borba, Gelaye and Byatt.
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons
Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums
is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited
and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted
academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not
comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2022 Prom, Denduluri, Philpotts, Rondon, Borba, Gelaye and Byatt. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.