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dc.contributor.authorMangione, Carol M
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Michael J
dc.contributor.authorNicholson, Wanda K
dc.contributor.authorCabana, Michael
dc.contributor.authorChelmow, David
dc.contributor.authorCoker, Tumaini Rucker
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Karina W
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Esa M
dc.contributor.authorDonahue, Katrina E
dc.contributor.authorJaén, Carlos Roberto
dc.contributor.authorKubik, Martha
dc.contributor.authorLi, Li
dc.contributor.authorOgedegbe, Gbenga
dc.contributor.authorPbert, Lori
dc.contributor.authorRuiz, John M
dc.contributor.authorSilverstein, Michael
dc.contributor.authorStevermer, James
dc.contributor.authorWong, John B
dc.date.accessioned2023-01-03T15:43:50Z
dc.date.available2023-01-03T15:43:50Z
dc.date.issued2022-10-11
dc.identifier.citationUS Preventive Services Task Force, Mangione CM, Barry MJ, Nicholson WK, Cabana M, Chelmow D, Coker TR, Davidson KW, Davis EM, Donahue KE, Jaén CR, Kubik M, Li L, Ogedegbe G, Pbert L, Ruiz JM, Silverstein M, Stevermer J, Wong JB. Screening for Depression and Suicide Risk in Children and Adolescents: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA. 2022 Oct 18;328(15):1534-1542. doi: 10.1001/jama.2022.16946. PMID: 36219440.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1538-3598
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/jama.2022.16946en_US
dc.identifier.pmid36219440
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/51515
dc.description.abstractImportance: Depression is a leading cause of disability in the US. Children and adolescents with depression typically have functional impairments in their performance at school or work as well as in their interactions with their families and peers. Depression can also negatively affect the developmental trajectories of affected youth. Major depressive disorder (MDD) in children and adolescents is strongly associated with recurrent depression in adulthood; other mental disorders; and increased risk for suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and suicide completion. Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among youth aged 10 to 19 years. Psychiatric disorders and previous suicide attempts increase suicide risk. Objective: To update its 2014 and 2016 recommendations, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) commissioned a systematic review to evaluate the benefits and harms of screening, accuracy of screening, and benefits and harms of treatment of MDD and suicide risk in children and adolescents that would be applicable to primary care settings. Population: Children and adolescents who do not have a diagnosed mental health condition or are not showing recognized signs or symptoms of depression or suicide risk. Evidence assessment: The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that screening for MDD in adolescents aged 12 to 18 years has a moderate net benefit. The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient on screening for MDD in children 11 years or younger. The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient on the benefit and harms of screening for suicide risk in children and adolescents owing to a lack of evidence. Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends screening for MDD in adolescents aged 12 to 18 years. (B recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for MDD in children 11 years or younger. (I statement) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for suicide risk in children and adolescents. (I statement).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJAMAen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2022.16946en_US
dc.titleScreening for Depression and Suicide Risk in Children and Adolescents: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statementen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleJAMA
dc.source.volume328
dc.source.issue15
dc.source.beginpage1534
dc.source.endpage1542
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalJAMA
dc.contributor.departmentPopulation and Quantitative Health Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPrevention Research Centeren_US


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